JCT contracts and the Construction Act

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAYlast_img read more

Lyons doesn’t grasp planning nettle

first_imgGet your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

A triumph for hill tribe junior cricket

first_imgThe 27th staging of the San Miguel Chiang Mai International Cricket Sixes from March 30-April 5, saw the side from Bangladesh, the Walton Cricketeers, win the Cup for the third year in a row, but there is no doubt that it was the Thai junior cricketers, many of them supported by the Hill Tribe Fund, who stole the show this year as they delighted crowds and players alike with their performances.  The San Miguel Thais only lost one match all week to win the Joe Carpenter Plate with the most exciting contest of the week, the Plate final against Blythswood bringing the competition to a perfect end with the boys scrambling a bye off the last ball to secure victory by the narrowest possible margin.  No fewer than five junior girls played in the 2014 competition with 14-year-old Nok becoming the first to win a trophy as Gymkhana Cavaliers defeated Sa Pa in the Spoon final.The victorious San Miguel Thais junior cricket team won the Joe Carpenter Plate at the 27th annual Chiang Mai Cricket Sixes tournament.Walton Cricketeers were undoubtedly the strongest side in the competition in 2014 but they were careful to play by the rules as their two best players, Elias Sunny, who has played Test cricket for Bangladesh, and Mehedi Hasan, also a first-class player, never appeared together.  The Bangladesh side beat Chiang Mai Warriors in the Cup final as they restricted the local side to a total of 40 for 4 in their 5 overs which they chased down in less than 3 overs without losing a wicket.  Mahrab Joshi was named player of the tournament for his all-round performances throughout the week.last_img read more

Justin’s sin bin

first_imgBy Nicole WilliamsJUSTIN Burrage has had his eye on a Holden Sandman since he was a young kid, when his…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

Galway GAA Results

first_imgOcean Hygiene Supplies and Packaging U12 hurling Group 2Michael Cusacks 3-5 Gort 2-3Portumna 2-14 Ardrahan 1-4 Ocean Hygiene Supplies and Packaging Under 12 Group 1Turloughmore 6-6 Castlegar 3-5 Ocean Hygiene Supplies and Packaging Under 12 Hurling Group 3Tommy Larkins 6-7 Killimordaly 4-1Rahoon-Newcastle 6-6 Kilnadeema-Leitrim 1-8 Ocean Hygiene Supplies and Packaging Under 12 Hurling Group 4Skehana-Mountbellew/Moylough 12-8 Ballinderreen 0-1Pádraig Pearses 4-9 Ballygar 2-6Bearna-Na Forbacha 5-4 Annaghdown 0-1 Ocean Hygiene Supplies and Packaging Under 12 Hurling Group 7Castlegar 5-5 Turloughmore 4-2 Bon Secours Division 1 Football LeagueMilltown 0-11 Caherlistrane 0-11 Bon Secours Division 2 Football LeagueSt. James 3-15 Moycullen 2-17Cortoon Shamrocks 3-22 Oranmore-Maree 2-15 Bon Secours Division 3 Football LeagueNaomh Anna, Leitir Mór 1-15 Corofin 1-10 Bon Secours Division 4 Football LeagueGlenamaddy 3-17 St Brendan’s 3-10Clifden 5-12 Renvyle 0-7Williamstown 1-17 Mountbellew/Moylough 0-11 Kevin Burke Tyres Division 2 Hurling LeagueBallinderreen 4-21 St Mary’s GAA Athenry 2-23Beagh 0-19 Ardrahan 1-13 Ocean Hygiene Supplies and Packaging U12 Hurling Group 5Killimor 1-12 Abbeyknockmoy 1-2 Wers Waste U-15 Division 1 NorthOranmore-Maree 3-15 Monivea-Abbey 1-10Claregalway 1-13 Corofin 1-8 Wers Waste U-15 Division 2 NDunmore MacHales W/O St. Gabriels – Claregalway 7-8 Annaghdown 1-3 Wers Waste U-15 Division 2 WestOughterard 3-9 St Michael’s 3-6 Wers Waste U-15 Division 3 ASalthill-Knocknacarra 6-8 Mountbellew/Moylough 4-11 Wers Waste U-15 Division 3 BCaltra 7-18 Kilkerrin-Clonberne 5-9 Ocean Hygiene Supplies and Packaging Under 12 Hurling Group 8St Mary’s GAA Athenry 8-5 Oranmore-Maree 0-3 Wers Waste U-12 League Finals(Group 2 B League Final), Claregalway 1-9 Oranmore-Maree 2-4 Division 5 League (North)Caherlistrane 1-16 Kilkerrin-Clonberne 1-5Corofin W/O Milltown – St Mary’s GAA Athenry 2-12 Headford 1-8 Division 7 League (North)Cortoon Shamrocks W/O St Brendan’s –print WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Email Turloughmore 3-20 Sarsfields 0-14St Thomas 3-17 Gort 2-20 KevinBurke Tyres Division 1 Hurling Leaguelast_img read more

Marshfield Junior Legion routs Plover, sweeps doubleheader at Wisconsin Rapids

first_imgBy Paul LeckerSports ReporterPLOVER — The Marshfield Post 54 Junior Legion baseball team scored multiple runs in four different innings and went on to blast Plover 9-1 in a Wisconsin Valley Legion League game Tuesday at Memorial Park.Marshfield scored three times in the second and added two runs in the third, fourth, and seventh innings to run away with the victory and improve to 6-3 overall and in league play.Riley Boushack and Mason Coffren each had two hits, and Coffren and Jacob Earll both had two RBIs for the Blue Devils.Tyler Spaeth earned the victory for Marshfield, throwing five shutout innings with two strikeouts. Ryan Zickert and Coffren each pitched an inning to finish off the win.Marshfield will compete in the Antigo Junior Legion Tournament this weekend. Marshfield plays Antigo on Friday night, East Troy and Gladstone (Mich.) on Saturday afternoon, and Oshkosh North on Sunday afternoon.Blue Devils 9, Black Sox 1Marshfield 032 200 2 – 9 8 1Plover 000 000 1 – 1 8 4Plover roster not provided.WP: Tyler Spaeth.SO: Spaeth (5 inn.) 2, Ryan Zickert (1 inn.) 0, Mason Coffren (1 inn.) 1. BB: Spaeth 1, Zickert 0, Coffren 1.Top hitters: M, Riley Boushack 2×4, 2B, run; Joey Goettl 1×1, 2 runs; Coffren 2×3, 2B, 2 runs, 2 RBIs; Jacob Earll 2B, 2 RBIs.Records: Marshfield 6-3 overall and Wisconsin Valley Legion League; Plover not provided.WISCONSIN RAPIDS — The Marshfield Post 54 Junior Legion baseball team had the bats going on Tuesday, combining for 28 hits and 18 runs in a doubleheader sweep of Wisconsin Rapids at Witter Field. Marshfield won 7-2 and 11-5.In Game 1 Will Voss allowed two runs in six innings to earn the victory, and he had two RBIs.Devyn Palmer also had a pair of hits and two RBIs, Boushack had three hits, and Ben Gust had two hits in the victory.Caden Schillinger went 4-for-4 with two doubles, three runs scored, and three RBIs in the second game for Marshfield. He also earned the victory on the mound, striking out two in four innings.Hunter Weik and Logan Schreiner each had three hits, and Schreiner drove in three runs for the Blue Devils.(Hub City Times Sports Reporter Paul Lecker is also the publisher of MarshfieldAreaSports.com.)Game 1Marshfield 7, Wisconsin Rapids 4Marshfield 002 410 0 – 7 11 1Wisconsin Rapids 000 110 2 – 4 8 0Wisconsin Rapids roster not submitted.WP: Will Voss.SO: Voss (6 inn.) 2, Logan Griesbach (0 inn.) 0, Devyn Palmer (1 inn.) 1. BB: Voss 1, Griesbach 3, Palmer 1.Top hitters: M, Hunter Weik 2 runs; Palmer 2×4, 2 RBIs; Riley Boushack 3×4, 2 runs; Ben Gust 2×4; Voss 2 RBIs.—Game 2Marshfield 11, Wisconsin Rapids 5Marshfield 200 124 2 – 11 17 4Wisconsin Rapids 301 010 0 – 5 5 1WP: Caden Schillinger.SO: Schillinger (4 inn.) 2, Jacob Earll (3 inn.) 6. BB: Schillinger 4, Earll 1.Top hitters: M, Weik 3×5, 2B, 3 runs; Schillinger 4×4, 2 2Bs, 3 runs, 3 RBIs; Logan Schreiner 3×4, 2 runs, 3 RBIs; Boushack 2×5.Records: Wisconsin Rapids not reported; Marshfield 5-3 overall and Wisconsin Valley Legion League.last_img read more

3 tips for being calmer and more creative

first_imgHBR has a nice post this week on quieting your mind – and recharging it. You can check out the whole article here, and I’ve posted a quick summary. Try one or all of these three practices:1. Mini-meditation: For 10 minutes on public transportation each morning, close your eyes and imagine a relaxing scene like a tree or waterfall. Try to focus only on that. If you drive to work, arrive 10 minutes early and do this in the parking lot. Says author Matthew May, “People who meditate show more gray matter in certain regions of the brain, show stronger connections between brain regions and show less age-related brain atrophy.” Sounds like a good reason to try this!2. Pulsing: Take breaks between stretches of 90 minutes of work. You just spent a lot of energy – now recharge for five minutes by doodling, listening to music or taking a brief stroll.3. Daydream walks: Find 20 minutes or so to let your mind wander. A lunchtime walk or morning jog are good times to try. Do not think about work but rather something you like to imagine, like a dream trip. You’re taking care of your creative brain – and the benefits will extend to all of your life.last_img read more

Why Your Emails Need a Personal Touch

first_img3. Make your email a part of a conversation.Sending your email from one person, using first-person pronouns, and including contractions will keep your note feeling conversational. If you write, “The Denver Puppy House is pleased to receive your donation,” or, “We used those funds to buy medicine,” you might come across as formal and dull. But if you write, “I am so glad you were able to make a donation to help our puppies,” or “I couldn’t have done it without you,” you’ll sound intimate and chatty. 1. Use a personalized greeting.If your friend sent you a note that said, “Dear Sir or Madam,” you might be a little confused. While you may not individually know all of your supporters, think of them as your nonprofit’s treasured partners and write to each one by name with a friendly greeting. Try saying “Hello there, Matt!” instead of “Dear Matthew.”2. Have a warm tone.Adopt a warm, welcoming tone by using simple sentences and informal language. This will help your email be breezy instead of stiff. Choosing shorter words such as “get” over longer words like “acquired” will make your email read as if from a friend. When your donors feel valued and special, they’re more likely to give again and again. One way to spread the love is by giving your emails a personal touch. Here’s how:last_img read more

Strategies to turn supporters into fundraisers for #GivingTuesday, and beyond.

first_imgYour year-end campaigns are just about ready to go, but making the most of December is probably in the back of your mind all the time. Perhaps you’re asking yourself if there is anything else you can put into motion today that can move the needle at year end.Yes! Try a peer fundraising campaign.The Power of Peer-to-Peer FundraisingSocial, Personal, P2P or team fundraising are all names for the same concept: harnessing the power of your supporters and their networks to scale your impact.At their best, peer fundraising campaigns center around a passionate desire to make an impact on a problem or cause, and then “recruit” supporters based on a shared interest in the cause or in honor of the friendship with the original project sponsor.Once in a while, peer fundraising campaigns catch fire. That was the case this summer with the Ice Bucket challenge. It started when 29 year-old Pete Frates, stricken with ALS, sought to bring attention to the disease, and to inspire others to support research toward a cure. He challenged friends to dump ice on their heads, and Pete’s network sparked into action. His friends took the challenge and in weeks it was everywhere on social media. From June to August 2014, more than 3 million donors gave more than $100 million dollars to the ALS Association.Your superheroes – no cape required.Campaigns like the Ice Bucket challenge are the exception for sure, but their lessons are transferable to every peer fundraising initiative. They’re effective because supporters, who often reside in the background of your fundraising, move front and center, and become the heroes of the story. We want to root for their success. And when combined with a few key elements, peer fundraising leverages your team’s limited resources, spreads your story, and attracts new supporters. What does it take? Sponsors with genuine passion for your cause, plus…· A little creativity· An authentic need· A personal appeal· Social sharing Make it easy for peer fundraisersEmpower your supporters to get going, now. 1. Suggest a theme and goal for your supporters. Use your #GivingTuesday campaign to frame a peer-to-peer campaign that is appealing and easy to launch for your supporters. If you’re still lacking a focus for year-end, here is a post that can help you plan a great campaign. Then break your campaign into a target for your peer fundraisers in $500-$1000 range. 2. Make it fun! Encourage your peer fundraisers to focus on opportunity, not obligation, in their outreach to friends and family. Give them tools to keep the excitement high with regular email updates tracking the progress of the campaign.3. Focus on impact. Be sure that fundraisers and their supporters understand how their dollars will impact those you serve, specifically.4. Keep it short: a month or less. Use the excitement of #GivingTuesday to keep momentum high and the time commitment low for your peer fundraisers. A timeframe of about a month is just about right. Encourage your fundraisers to launch on November 1st, build excitement toward Thanksgiving and end on #GivingTuesday.Make P2P work for you: three paths to success.1. For small or leanly staffed organizations: Start where you are.The simplest way to start a peer fundraising campaign is to focus on the tools you already have. You have your inspiring mission, more than a few enthusiastic supporters (think staff, board, volunteers, clients), and services that need support. Define a campaign, enlist peer fundraisers, educate them on the basics above, and let them run with it. Then, optimize your online giving page with proven software, like Network for Good’s smarter donation pages. With Network for Good’s donation pages, your site will be branded, mobile-ready, and easy for your donors to navigate. You’ll convert more donors and can encourage larger and repeat gifts.Then simply provide your fundraisers with sample emails, or let them create their own, and drive people to your main online giving page. Ask them to acknowledge the fundraiser they’re supporting in your dedication field. This is not the most sophisticated method, but a functional, quick-to-launch approach.And organizations using a branded Network for Good donation page for #GivingTuesday will automatically receive matching funds for donations made on #GivingTuesday!2. For organizations with more staff capacity: take advantage of a peer-to-peer fundraising platform.Nonprofits can set up a campaign by creating a fundraising page on a peer-to-peer giving platform. With a full-featured peer fundraising tool, you can create a page with your colors and logo and enable your peer fundraisers to set up sub-pages for their individual campaigns. They’ll be able to set an individual goal, see their progress, donor scrolls, and where they stand relative to other fundraisers.You can create challenges and competitions among team members that add an extra fun element to the campaign. And you’ll see the overall results of everyone’s fundraising with clean, comprehensive reports. You can then manage the messaging, the updates, and progress of the campaign. This approach is a great way to give your staff greater control of the whole initiative while also making it easy for your fundraisers to get their pages set up and launched. 3. For larger organizations or those planning to use peer fundraising as an ongoing strategy: have your own P2P site.Some organizations are naturally suited to peer and project-based fundraising. These include animal support, disaster relief, schools, health care, disease, and many others. Organizations like these can equip themselves to host multiple peer fundraising and crowdfunding campaigns all year round with Network for Good’s social fundraising platform.last_img read more

Nonprofit Spotlight: True Impact Ministries

first_imgCreating a Real Connection Meet True Impact Ministries One of the keys to their sponsorship program’s success is in TIM’s ability to create a lasting connection between their donors and volunteers and the children they’re supporting. From individual pictures and descriptions for every child on their sponsorship page, to their use of fun and approachable videos on social media, they work to create a true connection that makes a sponsorship more than just a donation. Network for Good works with so many amazing nonprofits and we want to introduce you to them and the great work they are doing! As part of our Recurring Giving Challenge we’re highlighting members of our leaderboard who are producing compelling, creative campaigns to recruit recurring donors and build a sustainable fundraising model for their organization. Today I want you to meet True Impact Ministries, a customer using recurring giving to sponsor children and the current holder of 4th place on our leaderboard. True Impact Ministries believes they have the ability to help ordinary people make an extraordinary impact on the lives of people in impoverished areas of the world. Since their humble beginnings in 2004, through the establishment as an independent nonprofit 3 years ago, they’ve proven this to be true. Their groups of volunteers have grown from just a handful to 35 volunteers planning their visit to Uganda this June! And as their mission grows, so too has their circle of supporters. Like so many nonprofit organizations, True Impact Ministries has changed and molded its mission to meet the needs of the communities it serves. Ten years ago, when True Impact’s founders Andy and Susie Stewart first began their work, they brought a small team of volunteers to Uganda to help build a modest school house. It was the beginning of an ever-expanding mission that now includes orphan homes, water structures, and medical care. In 2006 True Impact Ministries completed their second building project, an orphan home and rainwater collection system in Naama, Uganda. With this project they’d solved a problem by providing shelter, and created another by taking on the care of children in need. Building projects alone would not provide the schooling, medical care, food, and clothing these children needed to thrive. It was a problem they embraced by creating their first sponsorship program, a funding strategy that has helped them provide continual support for the children they serve. Sponsorship Model For more great videos and pictures head on over to Facebook to like True Impact Ministries and support the work they do!last_img read more

What Should Go On (and Off) Your Donation Page

first_imgWhen a potential donor lands on your donation page, you want to make it extremely easy for them to give. But if your donation page has a complicated form, too many ways to leave, or doesn’t keep the donor in the emotional act of giving, you could be missing out on donations! Here’s what should always go on your donation page—and what you should leave off. We know you aren’t a Web page optimization wizard, and you shouldn’t have to be. However, there are a few things that you, as a nonprofit marketer or fundraiser, can do to make your donation page super donor-friendly.center_img Top Tips for Creating the Best Donation Page Ever from Network for Good If you’re in a donation page mood (I mean, who isn’t?), check out even more resources on how to get your donation page in tip-top shape:last_img read more

The Consequences of Unintended Births for Maternal and Child Health in India

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on November 7, 2012August 15, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)A new study, The consequences of unintended births for maternal and child health in India, published in Population Studies: A Journal of Demography, uses data from the Indian National Family Health Survey to look into the relationship between pregnancy intention and maternal and child health outcomes in India.From the abstract:Data from the Indian National Family Health Survey, 2005–06 were used to explore how pregnancy intention at the time of conception influences a variety of maternal and child health and health care outcomes. Results indicate that mistimed children are more likely than wanted children to be delivered without a skilled attendant present (OR = 1.3), to not receive all recommended vaccinations (OR = 1.4), and to die during the neonatal and postneonatal periods (OR = 1.8 and 2.6, respectively). Unwanted children are more likely than wanted children to not receive all recommended vaccinations (OR = 2.2), to be stunted (OR = 1.3), and to die during the neonatal, postneonatal, and early childhood periods (OR = 2.2, 3.6, and 5.9, respectively). Given the high levels of unintended fertility in India (21 per cent of all births), these are striking findings that underscore the importance of investments in family planning.Access the article here.Share this:last_img read more

Planning Beyond the 2015 MDG Deadline to Reduce Maternal Mortality

first_imgPosted on January 16, 2014November 7, 2016By: Himanshu Bhushan, Maternal Health Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of IndiaClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)As we approach the 2015 deadline for the Millennium Development Goals, what does the future hold for international maternal mortality targets? The MHTF is pleased to be hosting a blog series on post-2015 maternal mortality goal setting. Over the next several weeks, we will be featuring responses and reactions to proposed targets from around the world. Please share your thoughts with us!Point 1:India has the largest annual birth cohort of 26 million babies. In 1990 our maternal mortality ratio (MMR) was 600 deaths per 100,000 live births which declined to 200 in 2010India achieved 66% decline compared to 47% of global decline.We have wide variations in the states. Uttar Pradesh in 1997-98 had MMR of 606 while Kerala had 150. UP came down to 309, while Kerala came down to 81 in 2007-09.The point decline of UP was 297 while that of Kerala was 69. UP declined by 49% whereas Kerala only 46%.Now the point is: targets for UP and Kerala cannot be same.Point 2:The targets and goals for MDGs were set in the year 2000, but its active monitoring by international and national organizations and countries began only after an initial 5-7 years passed. The countries started monitoring the achievement in the past 5-7 years.While keeping next MDG goals and targets and in view of our experiences with different states/provinces it is suggested that:There should be different goals for countries depending upon their present level of achievement since further reduction after achieving a low/very low MMR will not be easy.Percentage reduction (differential) for different groups of MMR i.e. MMR between 500 to 400 . . ., 100 to 20. . . can be one of the options.Every country can then give a differential target or goal to the States and population within their country.For each such group of MMR, the broad strategies should also be decided as a suggestion for the states so that the states having less than 100 or 50 MMR have a clear vision what additional focus is neededWhile preparing strategies, socioeconomic factors should be taken in account along with clinical causes.Process indicators for every 5 years and its part for every year should be simultaneously decided so that the countries know and concurrently monitor where they stand if they have to achieve a certain level within the defined time period.Finally, we need to discuss what should be our ultimate commitment for maternal mortality, whether it should be limited to reduction or should be a commitment like achieving a zero level, at least for preventable deaths – as in the polio programme.The points raised above are at present not the view policy of the government of India but my thought process based on experiences in the implementation and seeing the ground realities from close.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Solidarity and Stigma: The Challenge of Improving Maternal Health for Women Living With HIV

first_imgPosted on May 6, 2014June 12, 2017By: Donald Borenstein, Environmental Change and Security Program, Woodrow Wilson CenterClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post was originally posted on the New Security Beat, the blog of the Environmental Change and Security Program at the Woodrow Wilson Center. The post highlights an event focused on the connections between HIV status and stigma, respectful care, and maternal health, as part of the Advancing Dialogue on Maternal Health series. A video of the event is available here.Despite the fact that with proper interventions, the likelihood of mother-to-child transmission of HIV is less than five percent, expectant mothers with HIV or AIDS often face intense stigma and marginalization from health care providers around the world. As a result, in some areas, the mortality rate for mothers with HIV is seven to eight times greater than the rate for non-infected women, said Dr. Isabella Danel of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control.Leading researchers, clinicians, and advocates gathered at the Wilson Center on January 13 to discuss the need to re-evaluate maternal health priorities to create an enabling environment for women with HIV. “It’s not only elimination of new HIV infections in children, but it’s keeping the moms alive,” said Dr. Heather Watts, medical officer with the Office of the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator.Systematic Failures and AbusesFor women living with HIV throughout the world, the threat of stigmatization upon disclosure of their diagnosis is dire. They are often perceived as promiscuous, blamed for other HIV diagnoses in the family, or threatened with outright hostility over the prospect of having children, said Janet Turan of the University of Alabama.Florence Anam of the International Community of Women Living With HIV/AIDS said these women, “especially from Africa where I come from, are constantly in fear of losing the status quo of their life – family, friends, relatives, but most importantly the support they get from their male partners or husbands.” According to a study conducted by Turan in Kenya, pregnant women who anticipate male partner stigma are more than twice as likely to refuse HIV testing than those who don’t.This stigma often results in domestic abuse, and partner abuse of women living with HIV is a global epidemic. Naina Khanna of the Positive Women’s Network noted that a 2013 survey of women living with HIV in the United States found 72 percent of respondents were survivors of intimate partner violence or domestic abuse. As a result, they often opt not to disclose their diagnoses and fail to receive the necessary care and counseling.In the developing world, when women do disclose, they face another set of barriers. Clinics are often prohibitively far to reach by foot and women living with HIV can be asked to make the trip several times. “Going to the hospital to get tested at an [antenatal care] clinic and be told you’re HIV positive means you have to go back and bring your partner, and then you have to come back with him or bring someone to the clinic and they have to be told you’re HIV positive,” said Anam. “So many women come to the clinic when they’re pregnant, but do not come back again.”And health care providers are often misinformed about the nature and treatment of HIV. “Many times, providers are operating under false assumptions about the risk of transmission, which is added to already existing discrimination and stigma,” said Tamil Kendall of the Harvard School of Public Health.After carrying out community-based surveys on reproductive rights violations in Mexico, El Salvador, Honduras, and Nicaragua, Kendall noticed a clear trend of withheld care and abuse. Some survey participants recounted harrowing ordeals, ranging from complete denial of treatment to coerced or forced sterilization, including the story of one survey participant who was surgically sterilized without her consent while under anesthesia from another procedure. Such systemic failures and abuses seem to be the rule rather than the exception, said Kendall. “Under half of the women [surveyed] considered that they had received comprehensive reproductive health services, and in fact 41 percent said that they have been discriminated against by health care workers specifically when seeking reproductive services.”Another study, of care in Tanzanian public health facilities, found 77 percent of all women interviewed, regardless of HIV status, reported some form of abuse by clinicians in the process of delivering a child, according to Dr. Mary Mwanyika-Sando. “If 50 percent of women reported feeling some form of abandonment during an actual time where they were so vulnerable they needed a health care provider to help them as they are about to deliver their child,” she said, “where are we going with all this?”What Gets Measured Gets Done Dr. Hannah Sebitloane of the University of KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa believes a more focused research agenda could help. “Why is an HIV [-positive] pregnant woman in the area where HAART is now accessed…still more likely to die just because she has HIV?” she asked. That can’t easily be answered right now, and better quantifying the negative effects of not seeking care could tangibly show how social and medical stigmas are harming mothers.To this end, Kendall and Danel shared the results of a new study on anti-retroviral therapy (ART). It is crucial to document and evaluate ways to improve access and retention of care, they said, and available evidence shows improving access to ART for women living with HIV can make a significant impact in lowering mortality rates. “The longer women are on ART,” Danel said, “the risk goes down further.” On one hand, these are promising results, but overall, pregnant women are less likely than other adults to get the treatment, Kendall noted, meaning there’s a clear gap in distribution that is likely systematic and due to stigma.Combating Stigma Not An Easy TaskOvercoming the stigma that dissuades mothers living with HIV from seeking care is ultimately the goal, said the panelists.Personal accounts from people actually experiencing these stigmas can help tremendously, said Anam. “People living with HIV need to be involved in documenting qualitative research…it actually brings out the voices in what people, especially women, indicate as their challenges, and why exactly they do not access, or do not have the adequate medication, or do not get to the hospital in time.”Public support groups can also be effective. These groups allow mothers living with HIV to understand the needs of their child and themselves in a way that the impersonal nature of primary medical care often does not, Anam said. “You’re told, don’t breastfeed and nobody tells you why; check your medicines at this time and no one tells you why. But then moving this to a support group then breaks it down. This is what your medicine does, this is why you need to take it…The woman begins to understand it, and then begins to own it.”Kendall suggested a concerted effort to engage men, to prevent violence against women living with HIV and to reduce stigma caused by misinformation. Reaching men often proves difficult, however, as many don’t participate in maternity care, regardless of HIV/AIDS, she said. “We know less about how to engage men who are not already choosing to come to ante-natal clinics with their female partners in HIV testing and in support.”Ultimately, any effort to combat stigma needs to put the empowerment of mothers living with HIV first and foremost. As Anam points out, the effect of solidarity and group support is vital. “You walk out of that test room and you’re confused, and you don’t know what to do, and when you sit somewhere with that group of people and you realize you’re not alone – that in itself is huge. I don’t know how we can document that, but it’s huge.”Event Resources:Naina Khanna’s PresentationTamil Kendall and Isabella Danel’s PresentationTamil Kendall’s PresentationMary Mwanyika-Sando’s PresentationHannah Sebitloane’s PresentationJanet Turan and Laura Nyblade’s PresentationFriday Podcast With Tamil KendallPhoto GalleryVideoShare this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Holding the World Bank Accountable for Reproductive Health Commitments

first_imgPosted on April 18, 2014November 13, 2014Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Princess Sarah Zeid, champion of the White Ribbon Alliance, is holding the World Bank accountable for reproductive health commitments. Her article on The Huffington Post earlier this week emphasized the importance of keeping maternal and newborn health on the post-2015 agenda:The evidence shows us that to maintain the progress made, it is essential that we continue what we have begun, whilst expanding our investments if we are to spread our impact.To ensure that development is truly sustainable and to avoid far worse — to prevent a backward slide — we must do more for more.She also noted that reproductive health and family planning are essential for maternal and newborn health targets post-2015:Access to family planning — to choices about contraception — improves both maternal and newborn survival by lengthening inter-pregnancy intervals. Spacing the birth of children by three years will decrease under-5 deaths by 25 percent.Read the full article and learn how to help here.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Integration of Maternal and Newborn Health Care: A Technical Meeting and Blog Series

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on September 15, 2014November 2, 2016By: Katie Millar, Technical Writer, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)On September 9th and 10th, the Maternal Health Task Force and Save the Children’s Saving Newborn Lives program convened experts in Boston to discuss maternal and newborn health integration. The meeting, “Integration of Maternal and Newborn Health Care: In Pursuit of Quality,” hosted about 50 global leaders—researchers, program implementers and funders—in maternal and newborn health to accomplish the following three objectives:Review the knowledge base on integration of maternal and newborn health care and the promising approaches, models and tools that exist for moving this agenda forwardIdentify the barriers to and opportunities for integrating maternal and newborn care across the continuumDevelop a list of actions the global maternal and newborn health communities can take to ensure greater programmatic coherence and effectivenessBiologically, maternal and newborn health are inseparable; yet, programmatic, research, and funding efforts often address the health of mothers and newborns separately. This persistent divide between maternal and newborn health training, programs, service delivery, monitoring, and quality improvement systems limits effectiveness and efficiency to improve outcomes. In order to improve both maternal and newborn health outcomes, ensuring the woman’s health before and during pregnancy is critical.Reviewing the Knowledge BaseThe meeting focused on a variety of themes as global experts led presentations and gathered for small group work to discuss next steps for integration of maternal and newborn health care. While little research thus far has been specifically devoted to maternal and newborn integration, it was shown that great inequity exists among maternal and newborn health interventions and that while about 90% of women receive at least one antenatal care visit, only slightly more than half deliver with a skilled attendant at birth, and about 40% receive postnatal care. These disparities along the continuum of care helped meeting participants identify service delivery points in need of strengthening and optimization to ensure the health of both the mother and newborn. Given the limited knowledge base, leaders were encouraged to strengthen the evidence by engaging in research to identify both the costs, and potential risks of integration.Opportunities and Barriers for IntegrationOverarching themes that emerged while evaluating integration at the meeting included optimization of service delivery points to prevent “content free contact” and the need for efforts to be context specific. There was broad consensus that programmatic and policy efforts for integration need to recognize and reflect the local environment and the capacity of the health system. The meeting concluded that integration should not be viewed as an intervention in and of itself, but rather as a method of reevaluating and designing health systems to effectively provide better maternal and newborn health care, ensure better outcomes, and incur less cost. In approaching integration in the future, it was made clear that some of the most important factors for integration include assessing and understanding contextual factors, as well as anticipating what the woman, family, and health care workers need and want.Case studies were presented from Ecuador, Nigeria, and the Saving Mothers Giving Life program. Each presenter evaluated approaches for integrating health systems, programmatic strategies, and service delivery in order to optimize maternal and newborn health outcomes. These case studies provided potential models for maternal and newborn health integration in future programmatic efforts.Actions for Greater Programmatic CoherenceLastly, and perhaps most importantly, small groups presented action items and next steps to strengthen the evidence for integration and promote integrated care so that no mother or newborn is neglected in programmatic efforts. These action items were created for three levels: facility and service delivery; national policy and programming; and technical partners and donors.Proposed action items include improving and redesigning health workforce training; ensuring quality improvement; integrating health information systems; aligning global maternal and newborn health initiatives; integrating advocacy tools for maternal and newborn health care; and unifying measurement frameworks.Join UsJoin us over the next two weeks as the Maternal and Newborn Integration Blog Series unfolds. This blog series will dive into the details of the meeting discussions and action items. In addition, meeting participants and speakers will share their reactions to maternal and newborn integration from a variety of perspectives.Share this:last_img read more

Emerging Priorities for Maternal Health in Nigeria: Surveying the Field

first_imgOther notable workshop presenters included: Alh Sani Umar Jabbi, a representative of the Sultan of Sokoto; Dr. Kayode Afolabi, director of the reproductive health division in the Federal Ministry of Health; Dr. Kamil Shoretire of TSHIP-USAID; Dr. Okoli Ugo, the project director of NPHCDA SURE-P MCH; Dr. Moji Odeku,country team leader of the NURHI project; Ansa Ogu, the director of health planning, research, and statistics at the Federal Ministry of Health; Emmanuel Otolorin, the country director of Jhpiego; and Dr. Kole Shettima, country director for the MacArthur Foundation.Sources: National Demographic and Health Survey, United Nations, White Ribbon Alliance, Population Council, Nigerian Federal Ministry of Health. Photo Credit: Schuyler Null/Wilson Center.This post originally appeared on the New Security Beat.Share this: Posted on February 20, 2015June 12, 2017By: Katrina Braxton, Program Assistant, The Wilson Center’s Maternal Health InitiativeClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)“Nigeria’s population is only two percent of the world population, but we contribute about 10 percent of the maternal mortality,” said Oladosu Ojengbede, professor and director of the University of Ibadan’s Center for Population and Reproductive Health. [Video Below]Despite efforts to achieve Millennium Development Goal 5 – reduce the maternal mortality ratio by three-quarters compared to levels in 1990 and achieve universal access to reproductive health – Nigeria has seen only modest improvements to maternal health, said a panel of experts participating in both Abuja and Washington, DC in a live video conference supported by the Maternal Health Task Force and UNFPA, on December 17.The simulcast event was preceded by a day-long policy workshop in Abuja with 40 participants from a wide array of stakeholders, including the ministry of health, development partners, NGOs, traditional leaders, health organizations, and the media.Results from Nigeria’s most recent National Demographic and Health Survey indicate the maternal mortality ratio stood at 576 per 100,000 live births in 2013, compared to 800 deaths per 100,000 live births in 2003 – a 52 percent decline since 1990. Through roundtable discussions, participants identified five key factors to Nigeria’s maternal mortality that must be addressed to accelerate progress.Five Central ChallengesThe first roundtable, led by Dr. Chris Agboghoroma, secretary general of the Society of Gynaecology and Obstetrics of Nigeria, identified quality of care as a critical area for improvement. “The quality of care in most public and private facilities varies significantly from poor to near excellence,” he said. This inconsistency causes women to lose confidence in health services and leads some to refuse services altogether. To improve quality, said Agboghoroma, Nigeria needs dedicated departments in the ministries of health with motivated staff to enforce standards in training institutions.The second roundtable focused on the provision of integrated services. Dr. Hadiza Galadanci, an obstetrician and gynecologist consultant, said the lack of skilled health care providers, poor infrastructure, and lack of commodities, like family planning, makes it difficult to provide integrated services for women at health facilities. She called for the full involvement of traditional and religious leaders and a more comprehensive curriculum for health workers. Workers should not only be trained in reproductive health services, family planning, or maternal health as individual specialties; they should be able to treat any woman that walks into a facility with a need, she said.Dr. Adesegun Fatusi, provost at Obademi Awolowo University, spoke for the third roundtable. He identified social determinants – such as poverty, child marriage, home delivery without aid or use of a skilled birth attendant, and cultural or religious opposition to family planning – to be consistent contributors to poor maternal health outcomes. There must be macroeconomic, “pro-poor” policies within the health sector that specifically address the poverty rate and provide social protection for the most vulnerable, he said. In addition, stronger legal provisions that protect against child marriage, engaging community leaders, and prioritizing education within households and throughout communities, especially for girls, is required to change social norms, said Fatusi.The fourth roundtable focused on knowledge gaps and research needs. Efficient data collection, reporting, and funding allows for the interpreting of maternal health trends and translation into policy, said Dr. Oluwadamilola O. Olagun, a project manager with the White Ribbon Alliance. In Nigeria, an estimated 38 percent of deliveries take place in health facilities, which means over 60 percent take place outside a facility. A mechanism for collecting maternal health data from all delivery points is therefore essential, she said.Often, there is also a disconnect between research findings and implementation, which delays progress. More government involvement is needed in research projects and the benefits of these findings need to be better articulated to the government, said Olagun.Ojengbede spoke for the fifth roundtable, which focused on policy. For maternal health policies in Nigeria to be more successful and sustainable they require political commitment and incorporation into legal frameworks, said Ojengbede. The ministries of justice, health, and civil service organizations working on maternal and child health play an important role. They must support legislation on the state and national levels to ensure accountability and implementation, he said, rather than relying on ad hoc efforts led by third parties.“Fertilizers to Improve the Fruits of Our Labor”“It is evident that Nigeria does not lack expertise or insightful discussions,” said John Townsend, vice president and director of reproductive health at Population Council, serving as a discussant in Washington, DC. “However, the issue of moving intervention to scale and getting services to people still needs to be addressed.”The importance of execution was well noted by workshop participants. Galadanci called for more comparative research that shows which programs are working in different states to determine which should be expanded. Ojengbede pointed out that Nigeria’s response to the Ebola crisis was very efficient; it created a national sense of emergency which spread awareness quickly. Likewise, the perception of maternal health must be changed so improving conditions for women and children is seen as a national duty for all.Ojengbede expressed optimism about the outcome of the workshop and Nigeria’s ability to tackle these important issues. “The government and fellow participants both 100 percent agree that the recommendations from this dialogue will be applied like fertilizers to improve and increase the fruits of our labor,” he said.Dr. Wapada Balami, director of the family health department in the Federal Ministry of Health, said the recommendations would be forwarded to the Honorable Minister of Health, who will set up a committee to advise him on the meeting’s results. “This will help in shaping reproductive, maternal, and newborn health policies in the country.”Event Resources:Presentations from AbujaPhoto GalleryVideo ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

3 Smart Year-End Email Fundraising Strategies

first_imgEditor’s note: Want more email fundraising tips? Join us on Tuesday, September 26 at 1pm EDT for a 30-minute webinar, #NFGTips: Your Email Strategy for Year-End. Can’t make that time? Register anyway and we’ll send you the recording. Click here to save your spot!In my last article I discussed the importance of getting all your year-end ducks in a row.Today we’re going to take a quack at assuring your year-end email series gets opened and acted upon.A quack at it?Yes! Because I’m guessing you don’t have your ducks lined up to make this year’s email appeal worth all your effort.  What do I mean? I mean the majority of folk receiving your email will simply hit ‘delete.’ And that’s just not going to pay your bills.You need to get all your email duckies in a row. And I know exactly which three are missing.I’ve been in that duck pond. I know where your world-wide webbed feet are taking you.You’re painstakingly wordsmithing the appeal message… agonizing over just the right tag line… angsting over which photo is the most compelling… meticulously crafting your killer call to action… thoroughly assuring your donate button link is working… worrying about your colors and type face… and distressing about how you’ll measure your results. All essential things. But your email is still going to drown.Yup. Your poor little email is just a sitting duck for that delete button.Unless… you shift some of your energy to three simple, yet too often overlooked or back-burnered, things: The “From” line The “Subject” line List segmentationLet’s Start with the “From” LineThis is arguably the most important part of your email. According to a Constant Contact study, 64% of people open emails because of the organization it is from; compared with 47% of people opening emails because of what’s in the subject line. To avoid having your precious email wind up in the trash bin, you need to use the ‘Just Ducky! ’ Rule. And the ‘From’ line is at the heart of this rule. Let me explain.When folks see an email from you in their inbox you want them thinking “That’s just ducky!  An email from _____. She always has something interesting to say.”Whose emails do you open first? Chances are good that when you open your email box a majority of the messages are of little interest to you. You don’t know who they’re from, they look like junk, or they’re coming from someone who doesn’t interest you enough to compel you to open their message.  If you have time, maybe you will.  If you don’t, maybe you’ll hit “delete.”Who the email is from is often what motivates people to open it.  Your email should come from a person or brand your targeted reader knows, trusts and, ideally, likes.  Often this will be the E.D.  It could also be another beloved staff member or lay leader. Even when you have a trusted brand, you’ll likely get a better response from the person at the brand. People give to people, not institutions. If you’re not sure about this, it’s certainly something worth testing!Don’t duck out on this responsibility, please. Think about who the email is coming from before you begin to write.  Don’t leave it until the very end. Too often no one thinks about it; then the IT person or the administrative assistant is assigned to “launch” the email. Typically they do one of two things: (1) simply launch the email from a corporate account, or (2) innocently ask “Who’s it coming from?”The first is not so good, because it’s a thoughtless approach.  The second is not so good, because it’s an afterthought (and I’ve seen more than one occasion where the appeal was delayed because it took awhile to find a signatory or to create a new “from” email account that would work).Put a feather in your cap by planning ahead so that when your reader opens their inbox they exclaim: “Just Ducky!”Let’s Make your Subject Line a Real Firequacker!The subject line is the window into your message. 33% of email recipients open emails based on the subject line alone (Source: Convince and Convert).To be a great e-mallard you’ve got to give the reader a reason to open the email. Waddle you gonna do about this? You’re gonna make your subject line one or more of these things: urgent; intriguing; exciting; specific; useful; compelling; emotional, shocking or funny (even daffy). That’s what it takes to get folks flocking to you.Here are a few real examples:Four pounds, that’s what’s up This led to email about how a food bank client had gained weight after receiving nutritious food at an on-site pantry at her senior apartments.) Intriguing/FunnyAbandoned by budget cuts, they’re counting on usThis led to e-appeal to fund home care for seniors who were losing critical lifeline services due to budget cutbacks). Urgent/SpecificWhy the cheerleaders shaved their heads This led to a message from Indianapolis Colt’s coach Chuck Pagano, who was battling leukemia. Shocking.Get into your donor’s head as much as you can, and try to make it about the donor rather than your fundraising goals. For those who’ve given in the past, how about a simple: Did you forget you made this possible? This also has the subtle psychological benefit of reminding them they already did something. (Remember, one of Robert Cialdini’s 6 Principles of Influence is “commitment and consistency.”).  Compelling. Specific. Intriguing.Is it all over between us?This was suggested by grassroots fundraising guru Kim Klein. Emotional. Compelling.You have only a few seconds to capture attention. Subject lines with less than 50 characters have open rates 12.5% higher than those with 50 or more, and click-through rates are 75% higher. So generally plan to keep your subject line to 50 characters or fewer.For more inspirations, check out some holiday email subject lines here. If you happen to use MailChimp they have a  free tool to test the strength of your subject line. They also help you add emoji’s, and they suggest words that will negatively affect your open rates – You may be surprised – two of them are: ‘Help’ and ‘Reminder.’You can find a whole duck boat-load of ideas – many of which are as good as they’re quacked up to be — in 200 More Email Subject Lines from End of Year Fundraising. Just avoid those that could be coming from any nonprofit (e.g., “Just 48 hours left” is not great. “48 hours left to rescue drowning ducks” is better).But don’t mislead. That will make you a dead duck. Folks don’t mind being teased a little, but they don’t like being lied to. If folks open your email, but then see it’s not at all about what you promised, they’ll toss you right out.While we’re at it, consider your pre-header.  That’s an extra tool to convince your subscribers to quack open your email. What is it? It’s the snippet of text at the top of your email (or a link to the online version) that your subscribers see first, sometimes even before they open the email. Because even if you get your email open, studies show that 51% will delete your email within 2 seconds of opening it.  Aargh!Most email clients display the pre-header right after the subject line. This means if you’re using images, you absolutely must include an ALT description of the image for those folks (most) whose images are blocked. Talk to your IT folk if you don’t know what I’m talking about. And keep in mind the typical inbox preview pane will only show 30 to 40 characters (the typical mobile device shows around 15 characters). So make your lead-in count.Segmentation can Make or Break your Campaign.Imagine you’re an animal rescue agency. Half of your supporters love dogs; half love cats. Wouldn’t it make sense to devise tailored messages for each segment?The same holds true for folks who gave big gifts vs. small ones. And folks who gave for the first time vs. ongoing donors.You want to tweak your appeal slightly to show people you know them.You also want to customize your asks (and your donation landing pages) to match the language in your appeal.The more specific and targeted you can be, the better.Once you get these three things nailed – “From” and “Subject Line” plus List Segmentation – getting your email opened will be like water off a duck’s back.Hasn’t this been pun? Want more email fundraising tips? Join us on Tuesday, September 26 at 1pm EDT for a 30-minute webinar, #NFGTips: Your Email Strategy for Year-End. Can’t make that time? Register anyway and we’ll send you the recording. Click here to save your spot!last_img read more

Implementing Checklists for Quality Improvement: Webinar on August 26!

first_imgPosted on August 24, 2016August 24, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Join the Ariadne Labs team for Implementing Checklists for Quality Improvement: Best Practices Along the Implementation Pathway – “Engage”, the second webinar in their interactive webinar series dedicated to sharing lessons learned in checklist implementation for quality improvement.Ariadne Labs has developed tools including checklists for childbirth, surgery, and serious illness that have resulted in measurable improvements in patient care, and are now being adopted by private sector partners, governmental organizations, and health systems worldwide. The first webinar held in June 2016 presented the Safe Childbirth Checklist and Implementation Pathway and featured Dr. Leonard Kabongo, an obstetrician and quality improvement champion from Gobabis, Namibia.The second webinar in this series will explore the first step of the Implementation Pathway, ‘Engage’, and lessons learned in effectively preparing to implement. This webinar will also feature Dr. Rosemary Ogu’s experience implementing the Safe Childbirth Checklist in Port Harcourt, Nigeria.This webinar will share best practices in:Ensuring buy-in and identifying relevant stakeholdersEstablishing an implementation teamAdapting the ChecklistDate: August 26, 2016 from 10-11am (EDT)Access the webinar—Missed the first webinar in the series?Read our summary post: Lessons Learned from Implementing the WHO Safe Childbirth Checklist.Watch the first webinar.Download the slideshow.Join the BetterBirth Community.Learn more about the launch of the checklist and the Safe Childbirth Checklist Case Study in Namibia. ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: For more information on Safe Childbirth Checklist implementation, please email [email protected] the Safe Childbirth Checklist and Implementation Guide in English, French or Spanish here.Share this:last_img read more

Recognizing Child Marriage as a Maternal and Women’s Health Issue

first_imgPosted on April 10, 2017September 15, 2017By: Yvette Efevbera, Doctoral Candidate, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Fatimatah* was forced into marriage by her family at the age of 16. She described not wanting to marry: “I told him, ‘No, I do not love you, and I do not want that this is my husband. For now, I am going to pursue my studies, and even if I am going to marry, it is not with you. I do not love you.’”But she was already three years older than the age at which her sister was married, and her family said she had no choice. Fatimatah ran away from home, hid at neighbors’ houses and tried to finish her schooling, but was eventually forced to return home, where her family had already celebrated the traditional marriage.Married life for Fatimatah was physically and emotionally painful. Her husband was poor, and she was forced to find ways to earn money for her own livelihood; she still has scars on her head from carrying buckets of water and candies to sell over four miles a day. Her husband regularly beat her and threw objects at her, causing chronic back pain, headaches and sinus infections. Fatimatah suffered from three miscarriages that went untreated and is now told she cannot have children. She described her ailing physical health and overall wellbeing as consequences of her marriage.Unfortunately, Fatimatah’s story is not hers alone. Globally, one in nine girls marries before age 15, and about one in three marries before age 18. The majority of these child marriages occur in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. In Guinea, a West African country recently devastated by the Ebola epidemic, more than 50% of girls marry early, despite that the legal minimum age of consent for marriage in Guinea is 18 years old.As Fatimatah’s case illustrates, early marriage puts young girls at risk of developing numerous negative maternal and reproductive health outcomes including early pregnancy, reduced contraceptive use and poor birth spacing. Studies have also found poorer maternal health-seeking behaviors among child brides, such as fewer antenatal visits and lower odds of deliveries with skilled birth attendants.Women who marry early may also have lower decision-making power and autonomy in the household, another pathway through which early marriage affects health. Like Fatimatah, young brides may be at increased risk of experiencing domestic violence. One study found that women who married before the age of 18 in India were almost twice as likely to have reported ever experiencing intimate partner violence in their married lives than those who married as adults. In addition to physical consequences, these interactions directly led to stress and depression, as described by Fatimatah, ultimately affecting socioemotional wellbeing.Risk factors for early marriage, as well as poorer maternal health outcomes, may be linked to education and poverty. In the African context, early marriage has accounted for up to 28% of school dropouts in some countries. Girls with primary education or no education are more likely to marry early compared to girls with secondary education, and secondary school attainment has been documented to be disrupted by the marriage, as illustrated by Fatimatah’s case. When girls are not able to complete higher levels of education, their opportunities to find employment and earn income are reduced. Lower income and education may affect maternal knowledge, behavior and accessibility to resources. Moreover, a mother’s education not only affects her own health, but also that of her children. Recent evidence from across sub-Saharan Africa illustrates that through reduced wealth and education, early marriage negatively affects early childhood development, creating an intergenerational cycle.When asked to share any positive experiences from her marriage, Fatimatah responded, “Yes, there were positive things: suffering. The suffering that I suffered there. It is that which gave me the courage to become what I would be tomorrow, or what I am today.”In some ways, her story might be considered a success. Her parents, fearing for her life, removed her from her marital home after five years. Her knack for entrepreneurship and her perseverance to study enabled her to make enough money to complete secondary school, national exams and eventually university. She was also able to start her own small organization and is now in a role that allows her to guide and council other young women.So what we can learn from Fatimatah’s experience? Child marriage cannot be viewed or treated exclusively as a human rights issue. The public health community must also address it from the perspective of maternal and women’s health.*Name changed to protect the identity of the participant. **Fatimatah’s interview is part of a larger qualitative study on child marriage, health and wellbeing in Guinea led by Yvette Efevbera. Most sincere thank you to Fatimatah for sharing her experiences, to numerous Guinean friends and colleagues who supported and encouraged this research and to Dr. Paul Farmer, Prof. Jacqueline Bhabha and Dr. Günther Fink for academic advising.—Access resources related to global adolescent sexual and reproductive health.Learn more about child marriage from UNFPA, UNICEF and the World Health Organization.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Join Webinar 28 April | Diabetes in Pregnancy: An Epidemic Holding Back Progress

first_imgPosted on April 26, 2017April 26, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)While maternal mortality is declining in many parts of the world, underlying conditions affecting maternal health—such as diabetes in pregnancy—are often under-prioritized. Please tune in on 28 April for the first webinar in a three-part series, Diabetes in Pregnancy: An Epidemic Holding Back Progress, hosted by Women Deliver.The series will present the emerging evidence base, highlight promising programs and equip the maternal and newborn health communities with tools to spark greater action for addressing diabetes in pregnancy.In Part 1: Examining the Evidence, learn about the prevention, screening, treatment and management of diabetes in pregnancy to improve the health of women and newborns.REGISTERDetails28 April 2017 | 9:30am EDTSpeakersDr. Ana LangerDirector, Maternal Health Task Force, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public HealthDr. Gojka RoglicMedical Officer, Diabetes Unit, World Health OrganizationDr. Anil KapurChairman of the Board, World Diabetes FoundationDr. Hema DivakarConsultant Obstetrician and Medical Director at Divakars Hospital, Bengaluru, IndiaModeratorDr. France DonnayResources —Stay tuned for updates on the MHTF-PLOS Collection, “Non-Communicable Diseases and Maternal Health Around the Globe.” Infographic: Diabetes in Pregnancy ➔Infographic: FIGO Initiative on Diabetes in Pregnancy ➔Policy Brief: Improve Maternal and Newborn Health and Nutrition ➔Policy Brief: Ensure Access to Comprehensive Health Services ➔ Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Providing Equitable, High Quality Maternity Care in the Context of a Limited Health Workforce: Lessons From Nigeria

first_imgPosted on September 29, 2017September 29, 2017By: Michael Ezeanochie, Obstetrician/Gynecologist, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, NigeriaClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Shortages in the availability of well-trained health workers have been well documented in developing countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Even in cases where there are relatively large numbers of health care providers, inadequate pre-service and in-service training, suboptimal proportions of different clinical specialties and a lack of strong health system support remain major challenges to providing high quality maternity care.The question therefore arises: How do developing countries facing severe shortages in well-trained, equitably distributed health workers ensure access to high quality maternal health care for all women?Perhaps the most logical long-term solution is to invest more resources into the expansion of training capacity to meet the health needs of the population. However, amid widespread poverty and competing needs for scarce resources, as well as migration of health workers across geographic boundaries, this may not be attainable for most developing countries. There are several other potential solutions that may be feasible in the short-term, which are currently being tested in Nigeria.The Midwives Service SchemeThe National Primary Healthcare Development Agency launched the Midwives Service Scheme in 2009 to expand skilled birth attendance to reduce maternal, infant and child mortality, especially in rural communities. Since 2010, more than 2,600 midwives have been recruited and deployed to over 650 rural primary health centers across Nigeria. The program incorporates training of midwives and medical officers to improve the quality of maternity care while strategically adding to the health workforce.West African College of Surgeons training program and curriculaLessons learned from the Midwives Service Scheme partly stimulated the development of other innovative strategies involving redistribution of the health workforce to rural areas. For example, the Faculty of Surgery, West African College of Surgeons revised its training program and curricula in 2016 to include a mandatory six-month “rural posting” for senior trainees before their exit fellowship exams. It is expected that this will make senior health workforce team members available in underserved communities to work with and mentor non-specialist physicians in the provision of maternal health services.The Volunteer Obstetrician SchemeSimilarly, the Volunteer Obstetrician Scheme (VOS) was launched in Nigeria in July 2016 as an initiative of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Primary Health Care Development Agency. Under VOS, experts in obstetrics and gynecology who work in referral hospitals volunteer to commit some of their regular work hours in designated lower level health facilities where they treat patients and provide in-service training. This program gives experts in obstetrics the opportunity to share their knowledge and skills with caregivers working at community-based and primary health care centers.What is next?Nigeria, like many other developing countries in Africa, is confronted with severe health workforce shortages, but the resources needed to expand training capacity for health workers to meet the needs of the population are not readily available. Therefore, it is necessary to explore innovative solutions that maximize efficient use of the available health workforce, including redistribution to vulnerable communities. Programs like these could help to ensure equitable access to maternal health services with skilled providers. Rigorous research is needed to evaluate the effects of these interventions.Have you tried these strategies in your country? If so, tell us about it!—Read other posts from the Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF)’s Global Maternal Health Workforce blog series.Access resources related to the global maternal health workforce.Are you interested in sharing your perspective on the MHTF blog? Read our guest post guidelines and send us an email with your idea.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

LeBron Is Tired The Rockets May Soon Be Too

By Neil Paine, Chris Herring and Kyle Wagner Embed Code Welcome to The Lab, FiveThirtyEight’s basketball podcast. On Thursday’s show (May 24, 2018), Neil, Kyle and Chris discuss the conference finals yet again. Just how magical is Boston’s home-court advantage? Just how tired is LeBron James? Is the Rockets’ bench too thin for the starters to stay fresh? And what’s with Kevin Durant’s shot selection?The crew also talks about how the NFL’s new national anthem policy differs from the NBA’s in fewer ways than you might think.The Lab will be back with another episode next week. In the meantime, keep an eye on FiveThirtyEight’s NBA predictions, which are updated after every game. More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed read more

ThreePeat Kassiks Takes Home Third Consecutive Win At Beer And Barley Wine

first_imgFacebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Kassik’s Brewery once again took home first place at the 2018 Great Alaska Beer and Barley Wine Festival with their Buffalo head Barley Wine. Debara and Frank Kassik opened the brewery in North Kenai in 2006, and this year they defended their 2016 and 2017 title with their Buffalo Head Barley Wine win. Kassik’s Brewery is the result of Debara purchasing a home brew kit for her husband Frank for Christmas a few years back. Frank’s passion for brewing began and soon he became a proficient home brewer. In 2004 Frank and Debara spent the summer building a 36×50 shop while working their regular jobs with the hope of building a brewery. The Great Alaska Beer & Barley Wine Festival was held on January 19 & 20, in Anchorage. According to their website, the brewery opened its doors on memorial weekend 2006 with the Beaver Tail Blonde and Moose Point Porter. The Moose Point Porter was one of Frank’s home brew recipes scaled up for the brewery. Never in the twenty-four year history of the festival has a three-peat been accomplished. The festival featured over 300 beers, meads, and ciders from 70 brewing establishments located her, nationally, and globally. Frank Kassik, the head brewer for Kassik’s: “The winner for this years was a very small amount, only about 106 gallons and that was it. We actually did brew a second barley wine, which we have on sale that is very close to the winner, but what we do have available is a very small amount. You’re just going to have to come see us.” This is the third year in a row that Kassik’s has taken home first place, and makes Kassik’s the first brewery ever to win back to back first place medals three times in a row. Story as aired:Audio PlayerJennifer-on-Kassiks-three-peat-1-1.mp3VmJennifer-on-Kassiks-three-peat-1-1.mp300:00RPdlast_img read more

The Russian Ambassador and his Delhi connect

first_imgHonouring our diplomatic ties with Russia, Delhi Study Group celebrated the silver jubilee of Alexander M Kadakin, a veteran Russian ambassador to India. Vijay Jolly, the president of the group, presided over the event to elaborate on the bilateral relations between India and Russia.The ambassador was presented with a flowers, trophy and citation for his years long services to promote the ties between the two countries and its people. Mayors of South and North Delhi, Sarita Chaudhary and Master Azad Singh and Deputy Mayor of East Delhi, Mahender Kumar Ahuja, graced the occasion with their benign presence. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’In his address, Vijay Jolly proclaimed that during Kadakin’s tenure, the bilateral relations got a boost and we worked together successfully in the field of science, technology, space, education, military hardware and two way trade between the nations.  Kadakin, who is fluent in Hindi, French, Urdu, Romanian and Russian languages was a great force in bolstering the relations. It was a nostalgic moment for the ambassador who recollected his memories from 25 years. He also narrated his close relations with various former Indian Prime Ministers & his intense love for India.A photo exhibition relived  his moments in India with pictures of him interacting with great Indian leaders like Late Smt. Indira Gandhi, Late Morarji Desai, Late Rajiv Gandhi, Late Narsimha Rao, Atal Bihari Vajpayee, Lal Krishna Advani and Manmohan Singh during his long innings in India.last_img read more

Art space

first_imgMobel Grace in collaboration with Gallery Stupa 18 present Jugalbandi – an art exhibition that brings together paintings and art inspired furniture. The artists who are part of the show include Sudhir Tailang, Alka Raghuvanshi, Vilas Kulkarni, Shridhar Iyer, Manisha Gawade, Partha Sengupta, Anita Kulkarni and Ranjit Singh. The show is on from March 20 to April 15 at 343 Sultanpur, near Pillar NO 28-B, Sultanpur Metro Station in the Capital.The show is a jugalbandi of furniture and paintings as they co-exist together in our spaces.  “Art used in private and public spaces in residences and offices must have a balance of aesthetics so that their common link is visible. Paintings are integral part of interior designing and we strongly recommend it. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’“In this show we have tried juxtaposing them together so that the two can be viewed in unison and we have chosen art works that speak the same language as our furniture,” says the interior designer Meenakshi Goyal and director Mobel Grace. “The artists featured in this show all believe that the elements of paintings and furniture work in tandem to bestow a unique character to space. Alka Raghuvanshi’s vibrant and metallic colours add grandeur to the space. Anita Kulkarni’s works showcase passionately flowing colours which breaks the monotony of straight lined walls. Manisha Gawade’s lingering and bold lines blended with sophisticated colours hold the viewers thoughts,” says Varsha Bansal, director of Gallery Stupa 18. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixSimilarly Shridhar Iyer’s elegance radiates energy and blends with the space wonderfully. Vilas Kulkarni unifies the traditional as well as modern to compliment the natural shades of the space. Sudhir Tailang’s pithy drawings are perfect for the study and coffee table area where one can ponder upon life experiences. Ranjeet Singh’s paintings capture the expression of children portrayed in bright hues. Partha Sengupta’s bold and expressive countenances are energetic and reflect people’s personality. “Art has a universal language that it can be experienced by all those who view it. Given India’s vast history and culture of paintings dating back to cave paintings from Bhimbetka they are an integral element to energise spaces – be they work arenas or home spaces.  “Art can either be a statement or can blend sympathetically with a room’s design and colour palette. It is a way of personalizing a space,” says Deepak Goyal, the managing director Mobel Grace.last_img read more

IGI to get its own charkha

first_imgAir travellers are in for a surprise as Khadi & Village Industries Commission (KVIC) has decided to install World’s Largest Charkha at Terminal 3 of Indira Gandhi International Airport. Dimensions of the Charkha are nine metres (27ft’) in length and five metre (15 ft’) in height.VK Saxena, chairman, KVIC was pursuing this from the company GMR, who have the statutory right on Terminal-3 for the allotment of the land and space in and around T-3. KVIC feels that the Charkha is the symbol of independence of the country and 2016 being the centenary year of the arrival of Mahatma Gandhi from South Africa, it has different significances for Khadi. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Saxena  added that the display of this world’s largest charkha at national Capital’s ‘busiest airport’ will inculcate the feeling of Indianness and Swadeshi amongst the domestic and international travelers.In a meeting held on January 13 between VK Saxena, chairman, KVIC  and I Prabhakar Rao, CEO, GMR; the company agreed to allot this space for putting up large wooden charkha at IGI Airport, Terminal-3 at departure forecourt between Gate No. 4 and 5. KVIC will install the Charkha in one month’s time, which will be viewed by approximately 1,50,000 passengers every day at T-3.last_img read more

State has seen finances improve despite huge burden inherited from Left Front

first_imgKolkata: State Finance and Industry minister Amit Mitra placed statistics, highlighting the improvement in the last seven years with regards to the economic and financial parameters of Bengal. The turnaround, according to Mitra, has occurred even after a huge debt burden left by the previous Left Front regime in the state.In response to a query from Congress MLA Asit Mitra at the state Assembly, the state Finance minister pointed out that the debt and GSDP (gross state domestic product) ratio has actually gone down by almost 5 percent in seven years from 2010-11 to 2017-18. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal life”The ratio was 40.65 percent in 2010-11, from which it has gone down to 35.63 percent. The revenue deficit to GSDP has also dropped from 3.75 percent in 2010-11 to 0.96 percent in the 17-18 fiscal. The fiscal deficit has also halved during this period, to 2.83 percent from 4.24 percent,” Mitra said. According to Mitra, the Left Front government’s huge loan had been caused by their inability in implementing the Financial Regulation and Budget Management Act (FRBM). “Bengal had also lost grant of the 12th and 13th finance commission because of this and the Left Front had left a loan of Rs 1,91,835 crore,” Mitra maintained, adding that for repayment of the loan the state had to borrow Rs 1,53,741 crore, taking the total loan to Rs 3,45, 577 crore. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedChief Minister Mamata Banerjee also pointed out that the Left had not acted correctly in taking loan from small savings. “Loan from small savings is always an area of concern as it involves common people’s money. They did not sign FRBM and took loan from small savings, which is not right,” she added. According to Mitra, the present government is in a debt trap because of the previous Left Front government. “We have increased the revenue through fiscal discipline and e-governance, but still we are compelled to pay a huge amount because of the loan taken by the previous government,” he said, adding that the state has a debt repayment burden of Rs 47,000 crore in the current fiscal. Mitra asserted that the planned expenditure has grown over 5 fold from Rs 11,837 crore in 2011-12 to 56,604 crore in 2017-18. The capital expenditure has grown over 8 fold from Rs 2,225 crore in 2011 to 19,368 crore in 2017-18.last_img read more

I take a scientific view on these things Unless y

first_img I take a scientific view on these things. Unless you’re born a hermaphrodite, you’re equipped as either a male or a female, with designated X and Y chromosomes. If the kid wants a sex change later in life—and can afford to pay for it—then that should be a possibility. But for the parent to put that on its birth certificate is nothing but a political statement. As far as I’m concerned, you can call yourself whatever you want. If a person wants to self-identify as a two-headed crustacean from Mars, that’s fine. Anybody should be or do or have whatever they want—as long as they don’t aggress against other people or their property. I mean who cares how you “self-identify”? You’re giving other people more information by which they can judge what type of a being you are. I like more information about the person I’m dealing with. I think the current trend to self-identify as all manner of bizarre things is aberrant, and even sick. But it’s a matter of personal choice. The key is not getting the State or the law involved. Justin: So, what’s fueling this trend? Doug: This is just one of the many subsets of a greater phenomenon: the collapse of Western Civilization. Western Civilization is built upon the acknowledgment and understanding of physical reality, and concepts such as truth, honesty, and science. When Bizzarro World is accepted as being equally valid in the eyes of the law and most people, then a society is in trouble. This whole multi-gender, sex change and whatever trend is just one subset of the worms eating away at the culture. It’s why primitive and authoritarian forces like Islam are on the rise. They’re retrogressive, and repugnant to anyone that believes in Western values. But they offer certainty about what’s right and wrong, proper and improper. And—sad to say—the average person may be so degraded that he’ll choose that over the uncertainty presented by personal freedom and responsibility. It’s a pity. Many, or even most, of the people in the West are renouncing personal freedom and responsibility—even denying the reality of being born a boy or a girl—and substituting them with floating abstractions. Justin: What role should the government play in all this? Should they acknowledge these things? Doug: Well frankly, I don’t believe in government identification documents, driver’s licenses, or anything of the sort. Yes, I understand that over the last 100 years society has come to accept the supposed “necessity” of everyone having “papers,” like a dog or a cow. It’s a very recent phenomenon. But insofar as ID is needed, the market could and would provide it far better than the State. Are you a non-person if you don’t have a birth certificate? If this whole intersex, transgender thing wasn’t politicized it would be a non-problem. People have always thought and believed things that are not just outlandish but at odds with reality. But frankly, who cares—as long as they can’t impose their views on anyone else? They’re destroying their own lives, but it’s not my problem. Although it’s a symptom of a much bigger problem. But, to answer your question directly, the doctor should put “male” or “female” in the box, because those are the choices that correspond with physical reality at the time. Justin: I agree, Doug. The state should leave this alone. But I will say that it’s hard to stay on top of all the developments in the gender world. Just look at this survey that VIDA, a non-profit feminist organization, put out recently: There are 26 “sub-genders” to choose from. I didn’t even know that was a thing until I saw this. Doug: Yeah, they’re really innovative. Insane, actually. I’d say they hate themselves even more than I’m sure they hate straight white males. There are clearly many flavors of psychological aberration. Once again, it’s nothing that the politicians should get involved in. Let people put down whatever they want on their survey cards. I just feel sorry for the kids of these crazy people. It’s going to make their lives harder, but not everybody is dealt a Royal Flush at birth. On the bright side, maybe Nietzsche was right when he said “That which does not kill us makes us stronger.” So, here’s a kid that’s going to start playing his game of Texas Hold ‘Em of life with an unsuited 2-7. I’m sorry for him, but that’s what we call the luck of the draw. He’s going to grow up likely having to endure all kinds of harassment. A bit like what Johnny Cash sang about in “A Boy Named Sue.” Justin: But what about the child? They obviously had zero say in this. Should the government prevent people with “psychological aberrations” from doing this to children? Doug: Well, you and I may think that these people have psychological problems. But who can objectively quantify this? It would likely be left up to psychiatrists. But my experience is that psychiatry is the lowest rung of specialties on the medical ladder. They generally don’t have to know any real medicine beyond what it took to get their union card. Their cure for psychological problems is generally passing out pills, many of which are extremely dangerous. Plus, most psychiatrists are troubled people themselves. They become psychiatrists to bounce their own aberrations off of the person that’s paying them there to tell them his. They’re the last people to make this determination. We can all have our opinions on who’s crazy. But I don’t think there should be any formalized law or regulation on the topic. I don’t want the state involved in any of this stuff. You know, in Germany there are some names that you can’t give your kid. They won’t allow you to call your kid “Freedom” or “Liberty.” Those names are illegal to give your kid in Germany. Freedom isn’t much in fashion in the land of Karl Marx, National Socialism, the Stasi, Christian Democracy, Social Democracy, and what-have-you. Then again, why shouldn’t some state bureaucrat determine what I call my kid, or for that matter what the kid calls himself? God forbid the drones and proles might get the idea they could actually own themselves! Justin: Thanks for taking the time to speak with me today, Doug. Doug: My pleasure. Justin’s note: Every month, Doug shares his unique insights in The Casey Report, our flagship publication. If you sign up today, you’ll get complete access to all of our archived content, including recent essays by Doug on the Greater Depression, the migrant crisis, and technology. You’ll also receive specific, actionable advice to help you protect and grow your personal financial empire. You can sign up for a risk-free trial of The Casey Report right here. Casey’s controversial new investment secret could help you make average gains of 106%… For the past nine months, Casey Research has been developing a remarkable new way to pick stocks. This method has produced average gains of 106% with 91.4% accuracy. And now the Casey team has used this research system to identify the next four stocks you may want to buy immediately. Click here to watch an exclusive free training on this new method, and get the name of one stock identified by the system for FREE. — Recommended Link I can’t believe this “surfer dude” beat all those Wall Street legends… 650 of the world’s biggest and brightest minds… I’m talking about legends like Mario Gabelli… David Einhorn… Joel Greenblatt… and Rick Rieder… who, combined, manage more than $5 trillion… All were forced to bow down to one “unheard of” trader (pictured above) from Laguna Beach… Click here to discover the strategy he used while he had sand between his toes. Justin’s note: Just when I thought I’d seen it all…I recently read this story about a baby born in Canada that wasn’t designated a sex. Its birth certificate simply lists “U” under the sex category. The Gender-Free ID Coalition believes that this stands for “unspecified or unknown.”But it’s impossible to know for sure. You see, this has never happened before. It’s a “world first,” according to CNN.You see, the baby was born “outside the medical system” to a nonbinary, transgender parent…and did not undergo the traditional genital inspection after birth. Here’s why the child’s parent wanted it this way: It is up to Searyl [the child] to decide how they identify, when they are old enough to develop their own gender identity…I am not going to foreclose their choices based on an arbitrary assignment of gender at birth based on an inspection of their genitals.It’s a bizarre situation, to say the least. So I called up Doug Casey to try to make sense of it… Justin: What do you make of this, Doug? Doug: The parent in question is obviously very confused. Perhaps they’ve just been brainwashed by the wave of political correctness that’s washed over the world like a tsunami of raw sewage; if so, it’s possible they can recover. Perhaps they have the neurological wiring of one sex but the body of the other; I imagine that’s quite possible, and is nobody’s “fault.” Maybe they experienced some childhood trauma that made them hate their own sex, or gender, or whatever. Maybe any of a number of other things. In times past, someone like this would be viewed as a curiosity. They might have worked in a circus sideshow. Today they’re taken seriously. Look, almost everybody has problems, fears, inadequacies—issues—of one type or another. But if you want to succeed, you do your best trying to overcome, de-emphasize, or hide these things. You don’t go out in public and broadcast them. Why not? For the same reason a chicken with a physical peculiarity doesn’t—the rest of the flock will peck her to death. This person isn’t courageous; he’s just got less sense than a chicken. What’s worse, this person is burdening a child with their psychological aberrations—not very nice on the part of the parent. I’m a believer in nature over nurture, so the kid will likely survive and be whoever he/she or it is. But the idiot parent isn’t going to make growing up any easier for him, her, or it. Then again, I understand Facebook has designated about 48 sexual or gender identities… And people seem to live on Facebook. — Recommended Linklast_img read more

Baker Institute expert available to comment on possible merger of Dubai and

first_imgAddThis ShareEXPERT ALERTJeff [email protected] Institute expert available to comment on possible merger of Dubai and Abu Dhabi stock exchangesKrane: Merger cuts away a layer of bureaucracy that stands between foreign investors and UAE sharesHOUSTON – (Oct. 3, 2013) – The possible merger of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) stock exchanges in Dubai and Abu Dhabi is positive news for American and other foreign investors, according to an expert on Persian Gulf economics and politics at Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy.JIM KRANE“The merger of these two markets would cut away a layer of bureaucracy that stands between foreign investors and UAE shares and capitalize on the UAE’s recently granted emerging market status,” said Jim Krane, the Wallace S. Wilson Fellow for Energy Studies at Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy. He said a merger between the Dubai and Abu Dhabi stock exchanges has been in the cards for years, but it fell off the agenda after Dubai’s real estate crash in 2008 and subsequent debt meltdown.“This is another sign that Dubai is emerging from the devastation of its 2009 debt meltdown, when the world yanked out its cash and Dubai teetered on the brink of default,” Krane said. “One of the lessons learned was that Dubai and Abu Dhabi are stronger when they collaborate, rather than when they compete.”Krane is the author of the 2009 book “City of Gold: Dubai and the Dream of Capitalism” (published in the United Kingdom under the title “Dubai: The Story of the World’s Fastest City”).The Baker Institute has a radio and television studio available for media who want to schedule an interview with Krane. For more information, contact Jeff Falk, associate director of national media relations at Rice, at [email protected] or 713-348-6775.-30-Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews.Related materials:Krane biography: http://bakerinstitute.org/experts/jim-krane.Founded in 1993, the James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy at Rice University in Houston ranks among the top 20 university-affiliated think tanks globally and top 30 think tanks in the United States. As a premier nonpartisan think tank, the institute conducts research on domestic and foreign policy issues with the goal of bridging the gap between the theory and practice of public policy. The institute’s strong track record of achievement reflects the work of its endowed fellows and Rice University scholars. Learn more about the institute at www.bakerinstitute.org or on the institute’s blog, http://blogs.chron.com/bakerblog. last_img read more