Category: xevnzgry

Oklahoma State has a new white helmet

first_imgIf you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers! https://twitter.com/bteague12/status/383964142492598275Todays unis. #okstate pic.twitter.com/2Mcjb1KFp5— Oklahoman Photo Dept (@NewsOKPhoto) September 28, 2013I have to admit, at first I didn’t like it very much — it looks plastic-y, almost like they got it at Toys-R-Us — but from far away on the white jersey and black pants, it looks solid.I love the stripe down the middle and the black face mask.Also, this…not sure why we’re pumping Phantom Pete so hard.https://twitter.com/okc_dave/status/383968526165237761They should have looked like this…Here’s what the new #okstate helmet should have been – pic.twitter.com/SHJE3rp5Tx— Pistols Firing (@pistolsguys) September 28, 2013last_img read more

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Fifa’s ‘hardline approach’ at World Cup will be to take the money and run

first_img Twitter Uefa members rail against Gianni Infantino’s plan for new Club World Cup Gianni Infantino Fifa report favours North America’s 2026 World Cup bid over ‘high risk’ Morocco Facebook Pinterest Read more If you want to update your “Where are they now?” files, you may care to know that Jeffrey Webb in fact pleaded guilty three years ago to racketeering, wire fraud and money-laundering conspiracies in relation to his role as a Fifa vice‑president – but has now received no fewer than six deferments of his sentencing date.The seventh attempt at judicial closure is due to take place in September, though the form book suggests you might want to avoid buying a hat until you are sure. Until then Webb remains free on bail in the United States, presumably distraught at not being able to make it back to his native Cayman Islands, where he is separately facing charges of conspiracy to defraud the government in connection with a hospital scandal.As a legacy project, meanwhile, it is just possible his anti-racism initiative was shuttered too early. “I wish I could say that I am shocked by the decision but unfortunately I am not,” the task force member Osasu Obayiuwana said at the time of its demise. “The problem of racism in football remains a burning, very serious and topical one, which needs continuous attention. I personally think there remained a lot of very serious work for the task force to have done – the 2018 World Cup in Russia being one such matter. But it is evident the Fifa administration takes a different position.” Gianni Infantino has promised a hardline approach to racism, while Fifa fined Russia £22,500 over abuse of France’s black players and England £16,000 over a youth player sipping an off-brand energy drink. Photograph: Luca Zennaro/EPA Share on WhatsApp It is almost two years since Fifa wound up its anti‑racism task force, declaring it had “completely” fulfilled its mission and was therefore dissolved. That a banana should have been thrown on to a Russian pitch eight minutes into a Champions League game a mere three days after this dissolution was obviously unfortunate; that the banana should have remained there until the 15th minute arguably began to look like carelessness.Ditto news that racist and homophobic chants have become more common in Russia in the season building up to the coming World Cup, according to a joint report by the antidiscrimination network Fare and the Moscow‑based Sova Centre.As for the reasons given for the disbandment of Fifa’s anti-racism task force back in 2016, they are perhaps no more shameless than the governing body’s excuses in other departments. It is probably less embarrassing to suggest you have no more worlds of tolerance to conquer than it is to concede that the father of this particular programme is otherwise detained, in this case helping the FBI with its Fifa-related inquiries. In fact, the Fifa administration’s position was that racism would simply not happen at the forthcoming tournament. “This is a very high priority,” explained the president, Gianni Infantino, last year, “and we will make sure no incidents will happen.” How? By taking “a hardline approach”.To this end we were privileged to receive another lesson in Fifanomics recently, with news that a £22,500 fine was imposed on Russia after their fans racially abused France players during a pre-World Cup friendly – a number not exactly dwarfing the £16,000 the FA was required to shell out when an off-brand energy drink was sipped by an England player in the dugout during the Under-20 World Cup last year.What a long way we have not come since 2004, when Fifa’s fine for Spanish fans’ racist chanting during a friendly against England was precisely half the financial penalty it imposed on Cameroon for wearing the wrong kit in the Africa Cup of Nations that same year.According to a Times report this week, several England players are “dismayed” by the sliding scale of racism/energy drink-related offences, fearing it might mean a certain softness on any incidents of racism once the World Cup gets under way next week. To which the most sensible response is sadly: prepare for just this sort of disappointment. Read more Share via Email Share on LinkedIncenter_img Share on Messenger Share on Twitter Topics Reuse this content Thus a timeworn performance will be staged in Russia. Every day someone from Fifa will be wheeled out to answer journalists’ inquiries about incidents that have taken place and every day the “product” – football – will happily provide the best possible distraction from things Fifa has no intention of dealing with, along with other manageable diversionary rows, such as those over VAR.Fifa cares infinitely more about things such as ambush marketing and infringement of its trademarks than it does about revenue irrelevances such as racism or homophobia. For all the slogans and all his affectations the new boss is just the same as the old boss. comment World Cup 2018 Share on Facebook Fifa Share on Pinterest The plain fact is that once these sort of mega-events are under way in host countries with questionable records on human rights or discrimination, the governing bodies are usually reminded of their place – which is to shut up, take the obscene amounts of money and run. It became embarrassing to watch the International Olympic Committee try to get through its daily press conference during the 2008 Beijing Games, its representatives squirming as they were questioned about various Olympics-related human-rights abuses, the sentencing of elderly Chinese protesters to hard labour and so on.But the governing bodies are hardly going to halt an Olympics or a World Cup. All broken promises are beyond their control – even though, of course, they knew precisely what they were signing up for when they were typically “given assurances”. Assurances, ashmurances. This stuff comes from the top and it is hardly as if Vladimir Putin is going to find racist or homophobic behaviour an embarrassment, unless he has spent years enshrining them in Russian policy by accident. Sportblog Sign up to The Recap, our weekly email of editors’ picks.last_img read more

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Ireland have new plans for All Blacks in quarter-final, says Cian Healey

first_img Since you’re here… Share on Messenger Share on Twitter “I don’t know, you will have to ask him,” said the All Blacks attack coach, Ian Foster, when asked how Farrell managed to find ways of stalling New Zealand’s turbo-charged engine. “He does a job based on what he sees and so do we. We are assuming based on past behaviour that they will come up with a plan that they think is good enough to beat us. Will that involve some special plays? Probably.”Make that definitely. “We have some new stuff that we have not done before,” the Ireland prop Cian Healy said. “We have beaten them a couple of times in the last few years but this is a World Cup quarter-final. It is different.” Asked if it was the biggest match of his career, he replied: “Definitely. It is a do-or-die game. We all understand that.”It took Ireland 111 years to defeat the All Blacks but they have won two of their past three Tests against a side aiming to win a third successive World Cup. Their coach, Joe Schmidt, who is standing down after the tournament, came up with a set-piece play last November that the New Zealander had borrowed from the All Blacks and does not want this phase of his career to be ended by his compatriots.“I am sure Ireland will be primed and ready,” Foster said. “We were beaten by a good team last November, but that was a different time, a different place. Is it relevant? We don’t get stuck in the past: it is more about the excitement of the challenges in front of us. This is a week we have been preparing for a long time. It is where you really test yourself.”Ireland suffered a blow this week when their centre Bundee Aki was suspended for three weeks after being sent off last week against Samoa for a high tackle. They are waiting for the written report from the disciplinary panel before deciding whether to appeal, but on past precedent this tournament their chance of success would be remote. Rugby World Cup 2019 Read more Preparing to face New Zealand tends to keep defence coaches up all night. Since the last World Cup, the holders have scored 267 tries in 49 Tests, armed with attacking invention only Japan are able to rival.The All Blacks have failed to score a try in only two of those games, against the 2017 British & Irish Lions in the second Test and in Dublin last November when Ireland defeated them 16-9. The common denominator was Ireland’s Andy Farrell, the defence coach jettisoned by England after the 2015 World Cup, who is again plotting the downfall this weekend of a side last defeated at a Rugby World Cup in the 2007 quarter-final against France. … we have a small favour to ask. More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many new organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Support The Guardian The Breakdown: sign up and get our weekly rugby union email. New Zealand rugby union team Ireland rugby union team Share on Pinterestcenter_img Rugby World Cup Topics Share via Email Rugby union Share on Facebook Homeward bound: The lesser known lights who shone in World Cup pool stages Share on LinkedIn Share on WhatsApp news “Bundee is nowhere near a dirty player and he was upset about the decision, rightfully so,” said the Ireland forwards coach, Simon Easterby. “Until we have seen the report and know how the panel came to that decision, we cannot make any further comment while preparing for the match on the basis that he will to be available.”Easterby said that the key to success in their first World Cup meeting against New Zealand since 1995, when Jonah Lomu announced himself on the world stage with two tries in Johannesburg, would again be defence against a side adept at the counter-attack that is averaging 5.4 tries a match in the last four years.“We will need to be on the money without the ball,” said Easterby. “They have so many threats across the park that you cannot switch off for a minute. We cannot afford to give them any soft turnover opportunities and will have to be fully on our game.” Reuse this contentlast_img read more

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Trying to motivate people to change? Reward them.

first_imgIf you’re familiar with marketing, you know the principle of a benefit exchange: a reward offered in return for taking an action. A benefit exchange answers the question: What’s in it for me?For example: If I buy Nikes, I’ll feel like an athlete. If I go to your meeting, I’ll get some face time with senior staff.Benefit exchanges are useful for all kinds of situations. Like getting someone at work to agree to your proposal, encouraging people to change their habits or inspiring someone to donate to a cause.But we often get the benefit exchange wrong. We don’t offer a strong enough reward – or a sufficiently clear call to action.So here’s a mini-marketing refresh on strengthening the reward part of your benefit exchange. If you’re trying to persuade someone to do something, think about sharpening the “what’s in it for me?” answer with a better reward.A compelling reward has five important attributes: It should be immediate, personal, reflective of your audience’s values, better than competing rewards, and credible.Immediate: The best rewards are available to our audience right away. Few of us take action based on a reward that we expect to receive in the far future. It is human nature to seek instant satisfaction over distant gratification. So think about what your call to action will do for someone in the short term. Eating a hamburger satisfies our hunger, drinking beer makes the ball game more fun, and wearing cologne makes us feel sexier. Donating to charity makes us feel we made a difference for one person, today. How can you show an immediate result may be possible?Personal: The reward needs to make people feel their life will be better as individuals or within their tight circles of friends, family and community. Take the attributes of what you want people to do and sell them as benefits. What will recycling or sidewalks or education policy do for your audience? At the end of the day, the personal connection, not the grand concept, grabs our attention.Grounded in audience values: We can’t easily change what other people believe, but by plugging into their existing mind-set we unleash great power behind our message. Make sure the reward you are offering is something others seek – not just what you want. Those two things are rarely the same, but we often imagine they are!Better than the competition: Think competitively about your reward. Is it better than what people get for doing nothing – or something else? Don’t forget there’s a reason people aren’t taking action. They may be deriving benefits from those behaviors. How can you make your reward better than what people get from maintaining the status quo?Credible: Last, you need to make sure the claim of your benefit is believable. People need to believe they can get the reward. Show other people gaining the promised benefit or telling a good story can bolster your case. Make the promise change credible.If people aren’t doing what you want, you may find out why by reviewing this list. Are you making your offer sufficiently irresistible? Or could you sweeten the reward in one of these areas? It’s worth the effort to consider, because a great benefit exchange makes it far easier (and faster) to get to yes.last_img read more

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The Lancet Maternal Health Series: External Shocks and Health System Innovations

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on November 28, 2016January 6, 2017By: Sarah Hodin, Project Coordinator II, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The Lancet Maternal Health Series published in September 2016 contains six papers highlighting the importance of improving access to high quality maternal health care for all women across the globe. In paper 5, “Next generation maternal health: External shocks and health-system innovations,” Kruk and colleagues discuss how social, political, environmental and demographic changes will influence the future of global maternal health and highlight key health system innovations with potential for large impact.External shocksThe authors review a number of rapid societal and health system changes or “external shocks” that are anticipated over the next two decades, focusing on those that they believe will have the greatest influence on maternal health.Rise in domestic health financingIn the coming years, external donor funding and international aid for health financing is projected to decline, and low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) in particular will need to boost domestic financing. Despite evidence that spending on health is a wise investment, many countries lack the political will to allocate sufficient resources. The vast majority of countries in sub-Saharan Africa, for example, designate less than 15% of their national budgets to health. While initiatives such as the Global Financing Facility offer hope for continued financial investment, LMICs will need to prioritize maternal health to improve access, utilization and quality of care.Shifts in governance for healthUnder the Millennium Development Goals, maternal health was a stand-alone goal. Now that the world has transitioned to the Sustainable Development Goals, maternal health is just one focus area within the broader goal to “ensure healthy lives and promote wellbeing for all at all ages.” Continued prioritization of maternal health is crucial given this broader framework. Furthermore, there has been a trend towards fragmentation in governance and financing related to maternal health: For example, the introduction of related initiatives focused on newborns, adolescents, family planning and nutrition, while important, may complicate priority setting and dilute funding for maternal health programs. Ensuring the synergy of reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health efforts will amplify collective impact.UrbanizationAccording to the United Nations, about 66% of the world’s population will live in urban areas by 2050. Fifteen years ago, 39% of births occurred in urban areas; The authors project that in 2030, that figure will rise to 52%. Urbanization carries a number of benefits for pregnant women including reduced travel time to health facilities and a higher ratio of well-trained providers to patients. However, the rich-poor gap can be even larger in cities compared to rural areas. Additionally, many families move from rural areas to urban slums, where quality of care and people’s overall health status tend to be poor. To respond to the effects of urbanization, countries will need to strengthen their health systems and prepare for higher demand for services in cities.EmergenciesInfectious disease outbreaks, armed conflict and natural disasters due to climate change create a double burden by increasing the demand for health services and decreasing the capacity of health systems to provide those services. Pregnant women and children are disproportionately affected by such humanitarian crises. One study found that the maternal mortality ratios (MMRs) of countries in Sub-Saharan Africa that recently experienced armed conflict were 45% higher than those that did not. Following the Ebola virus outbreak, maternal mortality has risen dramatically in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, whose current MMR is approximately 1,360 deaths per 100,000 live births. More recently, the Zika virus has created unique challenges related to women’s sexual and reproductive health and rights. Health systems must become more resilient to ensure that women and children receive the care they need during emergencies.Health-system innovationsUniversal health coverageThe goal of universal health coverage (UHC) is to ensure that everyone, regardless of socioeconomic status, receives essential health services without suffering financial hardship. UHC has the potential to improve maternal health by expanding coverage of maternity services, as well as access to care for chronic illnesses, non-communicable diseases and other conditions affecting women before, during and after pregnancy. Countries including Mexico and Rwanda have improved poor women’s access to health services by instituting national health insurance programs. However, the authors astutely point out that access alone will not improve outcomes: Quality of care is also critical.Behavioral economicsEvidence from behavioral economics illustrates the power of psychological factors in driving decision-making. People do not always make informed, rational decisions, especially those experiencing the daily stresses associated with poverty. Public health professionals can help address this challenge by implementing programs that encourage people to make better decisions about their health. Strategies include using a default choice, framing information differently and providing economic incentives such as cash transfers. Such programs need to be rigorously evaluated in diverse contexts.mhealthMobile health or “mhealth” is a relatively new field that leverages the growing accessibility of cell phones around the world, even in low-resource settings. Many countries, communities and health facilities have integrated mhealth into patient education interventions, data collection systems and performance-based payments for providers. Additional research evaluating the effectiveness of such programs is needed to better understand how these strategies can help improve maternal health.—Read summaries of other papers in The Lancet Maternal Health Series.Subscribe to get the MHTF blog delivered straight to your inbox.Share this:last_img read more

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Midwives’ Voices, Midwives’ Realities: Results From the First Global Midwifery Survey

first_imgPhoto: Midwife Zainab Manserray, who runs a clinic in Sierra Leone. Courtesy of Abbie Traylor/H6 Partners.“Midwives play a vital role in the health care of mothers and babies,” said Samara Ferrara, a midwife from Mexico, at the Wilson Center on February 27. But in many parts of the world they face a confluence of stressors that make working conditions miserable: low and irregular pay; harassment and disrespect from both patients and doctors; and little supplies, training or say in the policy dialogue about maternal health.While there is never any excuse for abusing patients, such conditions can lead to poor quality of care for mothers and newborns, as well as burn out among midwives themselves.Starting in 2014, the World Health Organization, International Confederation of Midwives and White Ribbon Alliance, with support from USAID, began a first-of-its-kind global survey of midwives to gain a greater appreciation of the challenges they face.After surveying 2,470 midwives from 93 countries, they published the results in Midwives’ Voices, Midwives’ Realties. In total, more than a third of those interviewed said they experienced harassment, lack of security or fear of violence. Fifty eight percent felt they were treated with respect, said Mary-Ellen Stanton, senior maternal health advisor at USAID’s Bureau for Global Health.“This report is not just about problems; the midwives have identified solutions, and we need to look at them carefully and see what can be implemented,” said Stanton.Burnout and over-medicalizationIt’s hard to overstate the importance of midwives to maternal health outcomes, said Frances Day-Stirk, president of the International Confederation of Midwives. According to the UNFPA’s 2014 State of the World’s Midwifery Report, out of the 73 countries that account for 96 percent of maternal deaths worldwide, only 4 had the potential midwifery workforce to deliver essential interventions.There is growing evidence that midwives help reduce maternal mortality rates in a number of ways, including by assisting with family planning and distributing reproductive health services, providing prenatal consults and attending births and leading community-based interventions to educate women about normal birth processes and prevent complications. Some call this the “midwife effect.” Investing in midwifery and listening to midwives can result in a 16-fold return on investment, according to the World Health Organization.But not every health system is embracing midwives. Twenty years ago, almost half of all births in Mexico were attended by midwives; now the rate is down to two percent, said Ferrara. Most births are now attended by physicians in private clinics and “over-medicalization” is the challenge. From 2006 to 2012, almost 50 percent of births in Mexico were planned or emergency cesarean births, a high rate for such a major surgery than can have significant effects on the mother and newborn.In Malawi, Nancy Kamwendo, a national coordinator for White Ribbon Alliance with more than 10 years of experience working in the midwifery field, said the problem is not enough midwives to meet demand. Even in the best districts, the ratio of childbearing women to midwives may be more than 800 to 1 (the World Health Organization recommends a ratio of 175 to 1). In addition, midwives work on average more than 58 hours a week, Kamwendo said, go months without being paid and operate in unsafe conditions that require them to travel long distances.“You can find one midwife at a health center,” Kamwendo said. “This one midwife will have to provide family planning care, antenatal care, labor delivery, postnatal care, neonatal care – one person, 24 hours.”A matter of voiceThe report emphasizes that when midwifery is sidelined as “women’s work,” its value is diminished, midwives face moral distress and burn out and the quality of their care declines.Some two-thirds of the global health workforce are made up of women, and on a certain level the challenges facing midwifery – professional, socio-cultural, economic – are deeply rooted in gender inequality, said Fran McConville, technical officer of midwifery for the World Health Organization.“It has to do with women’s status in society,” she said. “We have, frankly, a very big job to do around gender, power, politics and money and how those…things come together and link to undermine the health and wellbeing of women and newborns, as well as the midwives who are caring for them.”With this context in mind, one of the major goals of the survey was to give voice to midwives, tabulating their perspectives on issues such as vulnerability to physical and sexual assault, infrequent and inadequate wages and hierarchies of power in which midwives are not respected by senior medical staff. The sheer number of respondents is proof of a clear desire to share their stories, said Day-Stirk.Midwives have frontline experience that should be incorporated into the policymaking process, said McConville. “It strikes me that in all of these organizations, maternal and newborn health has been huge for decades, but the people doing the talking are not actually the people caring for women and newborns in the normal sense.”Ferrara said that as a midwife, the experiences shared in the survey rang true to her. “That’s the way we feel, and it has not been expressed in an official way before,” she said. “I think that’s a very big step to come forward and to listen to midwives’ voices.”Getting to appreciation and leadershipGetting more midwives into decision-making positions is the ultimate solution to the disconnect between demand and action, said McConville. Providing better education and training would attract talented and ambitious young people. Strengthening communication networks between midwives, meanwhile, would amplify feedback from young midwives so concerns can be taken up by senior midwives.McConville also recommended government and non-government organizations working in maternal health address at least two of the overlapping professional, sociocultural and economic barriers identified in the survey.Organizations like the World Health Organization have become more sensitive to the challenges around midwifery, balancing concerns about quality of care for patients and quality of life for midwives. And reports like Midwives’ Voices, Midwives’ Realities and The Lancet Maternal Health Series have helped people understand how to talk about it.In some middle and high income countries where over-medicalization is a problem, Ferrara said the challenge is helping people understand the added value of having a midwife present over a surgical or non-attended birth. “We have come to a point that we realize that it’s not enough to survive birth,” she said. “We want the best experience for mothers and babies, and we know that midwives can provide the kind of care that we want for future generations.”“My hope is that the midwifery profession will receive as much respect as possible, commensurate with what they are providing for women and their families,” said Stanton, “that we will raise the attention of the professionalism of midwifery to get the positive appreciation from women, from communities, from their employers and from policymakers.”Event Resources:Photo GalleryVideo This post originally appeared on New Security Beat.–Read a summary of the “Midwives’ Voices, Midwives’ Realities” report on the MHTF blog.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on March 16, 2017June 21, 2017By: Nancy Chong, Intern, Maternal Health InitiativeClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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New FIGO Guidelines for Misoprostol Use

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on June 29, 2017December 20, 2017By: Samia Khatun, Project Manager, Global Safe Motherhood Projects, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) call for a reduction in global maternal mortality to fewer than 70 deaths per 100,000 live births by 2030. Achieving this target will require specific attention to postpartum hemorrhage (PPH), which is estimated to cause more than a quarter of maternal deaths worldwide. The burden of PPH is even higher in certain regions: In Eastern Asia and Northern Africa, more than 35% of maternal deaths are attributable to hemorrhage.A relatively basic set of interventions can dramatically reduce the rates of PPH, including skilled care before, during and after childbirth, active management of the third stage of labor (AMTSL) and, in many cases, administration of uterotonics. The preferred uterotonic of choice is oxytocin, which is delivered to the mother by intravenous injection immediately following delivery. Where oxytocin is not available, storage conditions are inadequate or health workers are not trained to administer it safely, misoprostol is currently the best alternative. Unlike oxytocin, misoprostol tablets do not need to be refrigerated or administered with a syringe, which can make it a more viable option in low-resource settings.In 2012, the International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology (FIGO) produced guidelines for the prevention and treatment of PPH with misoprostol along with a chart detailing recommended dosages of misoprostol when used alone for a variety of gynecologic and obstetric indications. In June 2017, FIGO released an updated chart informed by recent scientific evidence and developed through consultation with maternal health experts.The chart, divided into stages of pregnancy, outlines recommendations for dosages and routes of administration for misoprostol use for several indications including medically induced abortion, clinical management of miscarriage, cervical preparation for surgical abortion, fetal death, induction of labor and management of PPH. The chart has been endorsed by the FIGO Prevention of Unsafe Abortion Working Group and the FIGO Safe Motherhood and Newborn Health Committee.Some of the changes to this updated version include the addition of alternative routes for misoprostol administration and the introduction of secondary prevention of PPH. A group of experts agreed that secondary prevention of PPH is a strong, alternative approach to universal prophylaxis because it involves medicating far fewer women (only 5-10%), thus risking fewer adverse effects and substantially reducing costs.While the development of the dosage chart and its dissemination are critical steps in reducing the global burden of PPH, further work is needed to ensure that misoprostol is included in national essential medicine lists, high quality misoprostol is available—particularly in low-resource settings—and that health workers are trained to administer it safely.For more information, please contact Samia Khatun.—Download different versions of the new FIGO misoprostol charts in English, Spanish, French and Portuguese.Learn more about the updated FIGO guidelines.Read about barriers to misoprostol use in developing countries.Access resources related to the maternal mortality targets under the SDGs.Share this:last_img read more

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Raptors boss Masai Ujiri won’t face charges in Oakland skirmish

first_img 1 Comments Share your thoughts Toronto Raptors president Masai Ujiri will not face charges for a reported skirmish with a sheriff’s deputy in Oakland, Calif., after the Raptors defeated the Golden State Warriors to win the NBA championship last June.The Alameda County District Attorney’s Office made the announcement on Tuesday, the day the Raptors unveiled the championship banner before their season-opening win against the New Orleans Pelicans.Ujiri had been accused of trying to access the court at Oracle Arena to join the postgame celebration without showing proper credentials and also hitting the deputy.The DA’s office said it met with Ujiri on Monday, capping a summer-long investigation that spread into the fall.“The District Attorney’s Office has determined that no criminal charges will be filed in the matter,” a statement read. “However, Mr. Ujiri attended a meeting with the District Attorney’s Office focused on matters that we believe merited constructive, structured mediation and conflict resolution and were better handled in a setting outside of the courtroom.”Story continues belowThis advertisement has not loaded yet,but your article continues below. WARMINGTON: Raptors president Masai Ujiri owed apology, not charges ‘I respect authority,” Raptors’ Ujiri will let process play out Body camera backs up assault allegations against Raptors’ Ujiri: Sheriff Ujiri issued a statement that said he was happy the investigation is over.“I am extremely pleased with the decision,” Ujiri said. “While these past months have been difficult waiting for a determination on this matter, I understand the nature of the process and am appreciative of the efforts of all involved. I am happy that this is now behind me and I look forward to the task of bringing another championship to the City of Toronto.” center_img Toronto Raptorslast_img read more

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Zidane: Hazard not fit to play for Belgium

first_imgEden Hazard will not be able to play for Belgium in September’s Euro 2020 qualifiers, according to Real Madrid coach Zinedine Zidane.Hazard is yet to make his LaLiga debut for Madrid, having sustained an injury on the eve of the new season.Reports had suggested the 28-year-old would return to Los Blancos’ squad for Sunday’s trip to Villarreal, with Hazard having also been picked for Belgium’s upcoming fixtures against San Marino and Scotland. Article continues below Editors’ Picks What is Manchester United’s ownership situation and how would Kevin Glazer’s sale of shares affect the club? Ox-rated! Dream night in Genk for Liverpool ace after injury nightmare Messi a man for all Champions League seasons – but will this really be Barcelona’s? Are Chelsea this season’s Ajax? Super-subs Batshuayi & Pulisic show Blues can dare to dream But Zidane was adamant Hazard must not play, and instead the former Chelsea forward must use the international break to continue his recovery.”He can travel with the Belgium squad, he can be seen by the Belgian team doctor, but he’s not fit to play right now,” Zidane told a news conference.”We know that, he knows that and hopefully for the benefit of Belgium and everyone involved, he rests.”Our final training session ahead of the match!@Eng_Villarreal#RMLiga | #HalaMadrid pic.twitter.com/n4iJX6y312— Real Madrid C.F.  (@realmadriden) August 31, 2019Hazard is not the only Madrid player to have suffered an early injury, with Isco, Brahim Diaz, Rodrygo Goes and James Rodriguez all currently out, while Marco Asensio ruptured a cruciate ligament in pre-season.Zidane, however, is not concerned the glut of injuries suggest a particular problem with Madrid’s training or precautions to avoid such issues.”Injuries happen everywhere, at other clubs too,” Zidane said. “There are a lot of players who are out injured.”The doctors, physios and everyone who works with the players are doing their best to make sure the players return quickly from those injuries.”last_img read more

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‘Neymar clearly wanted Barcelona move’

first_imgNeymar clearly wanted to return to Barcelona over the summer, says fellow Brazilian Filipe Luis, with a domination of transfer gossip columns making it apparent what his future preference was.The 27-year-old forward spent an entire window being linked with moves away from Paris Saint-Germain.Various landing spots were mooted, but it quickly became clear that the South American was only interested in retracing his steps to Camp Nou. Article continues below Editors’ Picks What is Manchester United’s ownership situation and how would Kevin Glazer’s sale of shares affect the club? Ox-rated! Dream night in Genk for Liverpool ace after injury nightmare Messi a man for all Champions League seasons – but will this really be Barcelona’s? Are Chelsea this season’s Ajax? Super-subs Batshuayi & Pulisic show Blues can dare to dream No deal was done, with the deadline passing without PSG lowering their demands, and Neymar must now make peace with the fact that he has bridges to build in France.Quizzed by Marca on whether he feels a move was being pushed for, Filipe Luis said: “I don’t know. I want to believe he did, because if he didn’t then his name wouldn’t have been heard every day for two months.“But leaving Paris Saint-Germain isn’t easy because they don’t usually sell.“I see him as being calm since saying he’d stay. He can develop at PSG. They also have [Kylian] Mbappe, [Mauro] Icardi and [Edinson] Cavani. It’s important that they win something.”Antoine Griezmann Barcelona 2019-20While Neymar was unable to make his way to Barcelona, Antoine Griezmann has linked up with the Liga champions.That was another transfer saga which came as no surprise to Filipe Luis, with a former Atletico Madrid team-mate of the World Cup winner expecting a deal to be done.He added: “I understood it. He’d been there for a few years and wanted something new.“He gave a lot to Atleti and returned everything the club invested in him.“Being at the same place for a long time can lead to comfort that no longer motivates, so we all understood him and remember him fondly.”Filipe Luis Brazil 2019Filipe Luis also headed for the exits in the Spanish capital over the summer, with the decision taken to head home and link up with Flamengo.The 34-year-old remains convinced that he made the right decision and claims to have every intention of heading back to Atletico at some stage in the future.Asked if he could have spent another 12 months with Diego Simeone’s side, the experienced full-back said: “I could have, but we spoke and everyone decided it was time to separate.“The team are well covered in that position as well. I value the way they treated me until the last minute.“I plan to return, I haven’t even rented my house in Madrid because one day I want to go back and help coach the kids or anything at the club.”last_img read more

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How Clark County college football players fared, Sept. 22

first_img Next game: Stanford, Sept. 29, 4:30 p.m.Nolan Henry, Union, Sr., QB — Did not play.Oregon StateLast game: Lost to Arizona 35-14 to fall to 1-3 overall and 0-1 in the Pac-12.Next game: at Arizona State, Sept. 29, 7 p.m.Jack Colletto, Camas, So., QB — Played in a backup role. Completed 1 of 2 passes for 4 yards. Also rushed 2 times for 3 yards.Pacific UniversityLast game: ByeNext game: George Fox, Sept. 29, 1 p.m.Riley Miller, Union, Fr., LB — Receive latest stories and local news in your email: Tate Nelson, Union, Fr., LB — Did not play.WashingtonLast game: Beat Arizona State 27-20 to improve to 3-1 overall and 2-0 in the Pac-12.Next game: Brigham Young, Sept. 29, 5:30 p.m.Angelo Sarchi, Skyview, Fr., DB — Did not play.Noah Hellyer, Skyview, Fr., DB — Did not play. Zach Eagle, Camas, Sr.*, WR — Started at wide receiver. Had five catches for 61 yards. Had two punt returns for a total of 15 yards.Rudolph Mataia Jr., Evergreen, So.*, DL — Did not play.Kedrick Johnson, Hockinson, So.*, DB — Had four tackles, including three solo and one for a loss.Dylan Ingram, Camas, Fr.*, TE — Played in a backup role. By signing up you are agreeing to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service. Tyler Bergeron, Battle Ground, Fr, LB –Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyLast game: Beat Catholic University 34-24 to improve to 4-0 overall and 1-0 in the NEWMAC.Next game: Merchant Marine, Sept. 29, 9 a.m.Keithen Shepard, Union, So., WR — Had three catches for 50 yards, including a long of 38. Returned three kickoffs for 37 yards, with a long of 15. Returned one punt for five yards.MontanaLast game: Beat Sacramento State 41-34 to improve to 3-1 overall and 1-0 in the Big Sky Conference. Next game: at Laney College, Sept. 28, 7 p.m.Lane Andersen, Ridgefield, So., OL/DL — Did not play.Carroll CollegeLast game: Lost to Southern Oregon 27-0 to fall to 3-2 overall and 2-2 in the NAIA Frontier Conference. Next game: at College of Idaho, Oct. 6, 12 p.m.William Noce-Sheldon, Seton Catholic, Jr.*, WR — Did not play.Central WashingtonLast game: Beat Simon Fraser 63-10 to improve to 3-1 overall and 3-0 in the Great Northwest Athletic Conference. Gunner Talkington, Battle Ground, Fr.*, QB — Played in a backup role.Zion Fa’aopega, Union, Fr., DL — Did not play.Aiden Nellor, Union, Fr., TE — Played in a backup role.Michael Taras, Heritage, Fr., QB — Did not play. George FoxLast game: ByeNext game: at Pacific, Sept. 29, 1 p.m.Josiah Tully, King’s Way Christian, Sr., WR —Abe Smith, Union, So., S —Matt Henry, Hockinson, Fr., LB —Kyle Brabec, Battle Ground, Fr., LB — Noho Lidstone, Columbia River, So., LB —HawaiiLast game: Beat Duquesne 42-21 to improve to 4-1 overall.Next game: at San Jose State, Sept. 29, 4 p.m.Michael Boyle, Camas, Fr.*, PK – Did not play.Idaho StateLast game: Beat North Dakota 25-21 to improve to 2-1 overall and 1-0 in the Big Sky Conference. @col_mrice Peru State (Neb.)Last game: Beat Missouri Valley College 24-14 to improve to 1-4 overall and 1-3 in the Heart of America Conference.Next game: at MidAmerica Nazarene, Sept. 29, 11 a.m.Dylan King, Skyview, Sr.*, DB — Had five tackles, including two solo, and one interception.Portland StateLast game: Lost to Montana State 43-23 to fall to 1-3 overall and 0-1 in the Big Sky.Next game: at Idaho, Sept. 29, 2 p.m.Cameron Loos, Hockinson, Jr., TE — Did not play. Next game: West Texas A&M, Sept. 29, 6 p.m.Reilly Hennessey, Camas, Sr. QB — Completed 16 of 23 passes for 263 yards, including one touchdown pass (38 yards) and no interceptions. Also rushed 6times for 32 yards, including touchdown runs of 4 and 5 yards.Will Ortner, Hockinson, So.*, OL — Played on an offensive line that helped the Wildcats gain 601 yards.Isaiah Carbajal, Mountain View, Fr.*, DL — Made four tackles.Kai Gamble, Union, Fr.*, LB — Started on the defensive line. Micah Rice Columbian Sports Editor Cole Grossman, Skyview, Fr., TE — Did not play.Montana TechLast game: Beat Montana State Northern 54-9 to improve to 3-1 both overall and in NAIA Frontier Conference play.Next game: at Montana Western, Oct. 6, 12 p.m.Max Hiller, La Center, Jr.*, LB — Did not play.Zeek Fromel, Mountain View, Fr., OL/DL — Did not play. By Micah Rice, Columbian Sports Editor Published: September 23, 2018, 3:05pm Robert Meadors, Heritage, Fr., WR — Started at wide receiver. Had five catches for 25 yards. Also returned four kickoffs for 47 yards, with a long of 19 and recovered one fumble.Southern OregonLast game: Beat Carroll College 27-0 to improve to 4-0 both overall and in the NAIA Frontier Conference.Next game: at Rocky Mountain, Oct. 6, 12 p.m.Parker Randle, Battle Ground, Jr.*, WR — Had one catch for three yards.Nate Kuratli, Union, So.*, DB — Did not play. Some football games are crazier than others.Zach Lacey, a senior from Woodland, played a key role in one of Saturday’s wildest games. The defensive end blocked a field goal in triple overtime to clinch Eastern Oregon’s 54-51 win over Montana Western.Eastern Oregon (2-2) led 41-13 after three quarters. But Montana Western, ranked No. 22 in the NAIA, scored 28 unanswered points to force overtime.The teams traded field goals in the first overtime and touchdowns in the second. Then, after EOU made a 39-yard field goal, Lacey came through with a block to end a game where the teams combined for 1,036 total yards.Lacey finished with three tackles, including one sack for minus-5 yards. He has 12 tackles on the season. Rocky Mountain CollegeLast game: Beat College of Idaho 42-41 to improve to 3-2 overall and 2-2 in the NAIA Frontier Conference.Next game: Southern Oregon, Oct. 6, 12 p.m.Joey Roberts, Mountain View, Fr. OL — Did not play.Simon FraserLast game: Lost to Central Washington 63-10 to fall to 1-3 overall and 0-2 in the Great Northwest Athletic Conference.Next game: at Western Oregon, Sept. 29, 1 p.m.Gabe Lopes, Camas, Sr., LB — Started at linebacker. Had four tackles, all solo. micah.rice@columbian.com Jack Hiller, La Center, Fr., OL — Did not play.NebraskaLast game: Lost to Michigan 56-10 to fall to 0-3 overall and 0-1 in the Big Ten.Next game: Purdue, Sept. 29, 12:30 p.m.Caleb Lightbourn, Camas, Jr., P — Punted nine times for an average of 44.7 yards with a long of 52 and one downed inside the 20.Notre DameLast game: Beat Wake Forest 56-27 to improve to 4-0. Nehru Faalevau, Union, Fr.*, WR — Did not play.Jordan Hickman, Hudson’s Bay, Fr.*, QB — Did not play.Aksel Fredrickson, Battle Ground, Fr., DL — Did not play.Wyatt Harsh, Woodland, Fr., QB — Did not play.center_img Myles Artis, Hudson’s Bay, Fr., DE —Pacific Lutheran UniversityLast game: ByeNext game: Puget Sound, Sept. 29, 1 p.m.Logan Black, Ridgefield, Jr., OL —Tristan Thomas, Woodland, So., LB —Liam Nabors, King’s Way Christian, So., QB — Air ForceLast game: Lost to Utah State 42-32 to fall to 1-2 overall and 0-1 in the Mountain West Conference.Next game: Nevada, Sept. 29, 1 p.m.Brody Bagnall, Evergreen, Sr., LB — Started at linebacker. Had 10 tackles, second-most on the team, including a half-tackle for a loss.Christopher Mitchell, Mountain View, Jr., OL — Played in a backup role for an offense that gained 471 yards.Butte CollegeLast game: Beat San Francisco College 42-21  to improve to 3-1. Nathan Hawthorne, Columbia River, So.*, WR — Did not play.Brady Brick, Battle Ground, Fr.*, OL —Played in a backup role for an offense that gained 421 yards.Jacob Bystry, Columbia River, Jr, WR — Played in a backup role.University of RedlandsLast game: ByeNext game: at Pomona Pitzer, Sept. 29, 7 p.m.Blake Roy, Camas, Jr. TE — Also playing a role for Eastern Oregon were Bailey Buckner, a redshirt freshman from Battle Ground who recovered a fumble, and Jarred Telles, a sophomore from Evergreen, who had two tackles.As always, email updates to Sports Editor Micah Rice at micah.rice@columbian.com.Here’s how Clark County players fared on the college gridiron this weekend:* — has used redshirt yearAbilene ChristianLast game: Lost to Stephen F. Austin 24-21 to fall to 2-2 overall and 1-1 in the Southland Conference.Next game: Incarnate Word, Sept. 29, 4 p.m.Dakota Napierkowski, Camas, So., OL — Did not play. David McDonald, Union, Fr., DB — Did not play.Jordan Suell, Fort Vancouver, Jr.*, WR — Will redshirt this year.Southern UtahLast game: Lost to Northern Arizona 31-23 to fall to 0-4 overall and 0-1 in the Big Sky.Next game: at Northern Arizona, Sept. 22, 4 p.m.Taylor Nelson, Union, Sr.*, LB — Started at linebacker. Had six tackles, including five solo, and recovered one fumble. Max Randle, Battle Ground, Fr.*, DB — Played in a backup role.Canon Racanelli, Hockinson, Fr., QB — Did not play.Angel Terry, Hudson’s Bay, Fr., DL — Did not play.ChapmanLast game: ByeNext game: at Whittier, Sept. 29, 7 p.m.David Aarhus, Camas, Fr. LB — Follow The Columbian on Instagram Share: Share: Bailey Buckner, Battle Ground, Fr.*, LB — Recovered a fumble.E’Lon Mack, Heritage, Sr., WR — Did not play.Eastern WashingtonLast game: Beat Cal Poly 70-17 to improve to 3-1 overall and 2-0 in the Big Sky Conference.Next game: at Montana State, Sept. 29, 12 p.m.Roldan Alcobendas, Camas, Sr.*, K — Made all 10 PATs. His 234 career points is just two from the school record of 236. Also punted one time for 26 yards. Next game: San Francisco College, Sept. 29, 1 p.m.Brett Judd, La Center, So., LB — Had four tackles, all solo, including one sack for minus-5 yards.Lafitaga Sosene, Heritage, So., DL — Had one tackle.John Archer, Union, So., OL — Did not playWhitey Sosene, Heritage, Fr., DL —Did not playEastern OregonLast game: Beat Montana Western 54-51 in 3 OT to improve to 2-2 both overall and in the NAIA Frontier Conference.Next game: at Montana State-Northern, Oct. 6, 5 p.m.Zach Lacey, Woodland, Sr., DL — Started at defensive end, making four tackles including one sack for minus-5 yards. Blocked the field goal in triple overtime to clinch the victory.Jarred Telles, Evergreen, So., DB — Had two tackles, including one solo. Koben Jamison, Columbia River, Fr., DB — Did not play.Tyrek McCullum, Union, Fr., DB — Did not play.Alex Rodriguez, Evergreen, Fr., DL — Did not play.WyomingLast game: ByeNext game: Boise State, Sept. 29, 5 p.m.James Price, Camas, Sr., WR —Did I miss anyone? If so, email micah.rice@columbian.com. Next game: Northern Arizona, Sept. 29, 1:35 p.m.Caleb Eldred, Camas, Fr.*, OL – Did not play.LibertyLast game: Lost to North Texas 47-7 to fall to 1-2 overall.Next game: at New Mexico, Sept. 29, 3 p.m.Josh Tully, King’s Way Christian, Jr.*, WR – Did not play.LinfieldLast game: ByeNext game: at Whitworth, Sept. 29, 1 p.m.Will Warne, Mountain View, Jr.*, K – GO College of IdahoLast game: Lost to Rocky Mountain 42-41 to fall to 0-5 overall and 0-4 in the NAIA Frontier Conference.Next game: Carroll College, Oct. 6, 12 p.m.Chris Waters, Battle Ground, Sr., DB — Had one catch for four yards.Isaiah Abdul, Camas, Fr., DB — Had three tackles, including two solo, and one pass broken up.College of SiskiyousLast game: Beat Chabot College 23-20 to improve to 1-2.   How Clark County college football players fared, Sept. 22 Follow Washington StateLast game: Lost to Southern Cal 39-36 to fall to 3-1 overall and 0-1 in the Pac-12.Next game: Utah, Sept. 29, 3 p.m.Beau Braden, Columbia River, Fr., DL — Did not play.Western OregonLast game: Beat Humboldt State 38-13 to improve to 1-3 overall and 1-2 in the Great Northwest Athletic Conference.Next game: Simon Fraser, Sept. 29, 1 p.m.Nathan Hockhalter, Columbia River, Fr.*, DL — Did not play. (360) 735-4548 Next game: at Cal Poly, Sept. 29, 4 p.m.Kobey Eaton, Evergreen, Jr.*, DB — Played in a backup role.Rey Green, Union, So.*, RB —Did not play.Michael Matthews, Camas, Fr.*, LB — Played in a backup role.Skyler Martin, Skyview, Fr.*, OL —Played in a backup role.last_img read more

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2018 Super Bowl Provides Big Boost in Travelers to Host City

first_imgARC Found 69 Percent Jump in the Number of Visitors to Minneapolis  ARLINGTON, Va. – February 1, 2018 – According to new analysis by Airlines Reporting Corp. (ARC), Minneapolis can expect a big jump in fans flying in for Super Bowl LII, set to take place there on February 4. ARC found that average number of visitors arriving by plane jumped 69 percent compared to the average for the same week over the last five years. Compared to the last two years, Houston, which hosted the big game in 2017, showed a 39 percent increase whereas 2016 host city Santa Clara, Calif. showed just a 9 percent gain. According to ARC data, travelers flying to Minneapolis for the game paid an average ticket price of  $488. “While some of this gain is related to hosting the Super Bowl in a smaller metropolitan area this year compared to the recent past, I suspect some of the gain is a draw from the new U.S. Bank Stadium that has only been open since 2016,” said ARC’s Managing Director of Data Science Chuck Thackston. The analysis includes tickets purchased through January 13 from U.S. travel agency locations, and online travel agencies for travel the week leading up to the Super Bowl, January 28 through February 3. Results do not include sales of tickets purchased directly from airlines. The average ticket price is for tickets settled through ARC for an itinerary that included travel to the Minneapolis area. More information and data about air travel can be found on ARC’s website.  About ARCThe Airlines Reporting Corporation (ARC) is the premier driver of air travel intelligence and commerce in the travel industry with leading business solutions, travel agency accreditation services, process and financial management tools and high-quality data. In 2017, ARC settled $88.5 billion worth of airline ticket transactions for more than 7,000 travel agencies with 12,000 points of sale. Established in 1984, ARC is an ISO 27001 certified company headquartered in Arlington, Virginia, with offices in Louisville, Kentucky, Tampa, Florida and San Juan, Puerto Rico. For more information, please visit www.arccorp.com and www.twitter.com/arctalk.last_img read more

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Learn Sales and Marketing from the Best of the Best at CruiseWorld

first_imgWritten By: Mary Pat Sullivan, Content Director – Travel Weekly Events  The CruiseWorld team is fully underway planning general sessions, ship inspections, workshop options and industry certification programs for 2018. Leaders from the cruise and vacation market will take the stage to address the hundreds of travel advisor attendees. Travel professionals are more important than ever, booking everything from unique leisure vacations to massive corporate retreats. The executives attending are excited to share their stories and get to know the CruiseWorld audience, and garner their respect and their bookings! The CruiseWorld team is excited to announce a crowd favorite: the Mastermind Sales & Marketing Panel. This high-energy, industry star-studded group features leaders in sales and marketing from all major cruise lines. Always a pleasure for the CruiseWorld audience, this panel sets the energy level for the entire event and is designed to spark new ideas and excitement for 2019 and beyond. This year’s panel will feature the following industry superstars: John Chernesky, Vice President of North America Sales, Princess Cruises and Cunard Line; Vicki Freed, Senior Vice President, Sales and Trade Support & Service, Royal Caribbean International; Eva Jenner, Vice President, Sales, Holland America Line and Seabourn; Joe Jiffo, Senior Vice President, Sales MSC Cruises; Camille Olivere, Senior Vice President, Norwegian Cruise Line; Adolfo Perez, Senior Vice President, Sales and Trade Marketing, Carnival Cruise Line; Dondra Ritzenthaler, Senior Vice President, Sales and Trade Support and Service, UK & APAC, Celebrity Cruises; and Doug Seagle, Vice President of Sales, North America, Seabourn. All the panelists are great supporters of the travel trade and are enthusiastic about being on stage in front of such an important audience. Each of these executives values the relationship with their customers, the travel advisors in the audience, and they want to get to know them. The Mastermind panel is different from all other general sessions because the speakers share on a personal and professional level. They, too, work hard every day to succeed and they know how hard the audience works to succeed as well. It’s a lighthearted, fun, and informative way to begin the event. “The general sessions are an excellent way for executives in the industry to connect in a personal way with those selling their products. The speakers at CruiseWorld come because they want to do their part to support the efforts of today’s travel professionals. Being on stage allows them to directly address their most important audience,” said Alicia Evanko-Lewis, Senior Vice President, Events, Northstar Travel Group. Three days of workshops will allow attendees to earn CLIA credits, Travel Institute CEUs, various certifications, and gain hands-on workshop training from nearly a dozen suppliers. Travel advisor peers will lead a series of workshops on topics like digital marketing, group sales, business practices and considerations, and niche travel segments. This year’s Travel Weekly CruiseWorld event will be held November 7-9 in Fort Lauderdale, with ship inspection opportunities available at both Fort Lauderdale and Miami ports on November 10 and 11. CruiseWorld is once again offering its Select Travel Advisor Recognition (STAR) program. The core component of the STAR Program is a series of business connections scheduled between exhibiting suppliers and prequalified travel advisors committed to business growth. Selected advisors will receive complimentary registration and hotel accommodation for two nights. Those spots are filling quickly, with more than half already committed. Visit www.cruiseworldshow.com for more information and to register. Use code HBTA at checkout to receive $25 off the current registration rate.last_img read more

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Road Maintenance Project Gets $19.7 Million

first_imgA sum of $19.7 million has been allocated in the 2013/14 Estimates of Expenditure to continue work on a programme of support for decentralized road maintenance.The undertaking, which commenced in April 2011, seeks to implement a programme of institutional capacity building among relevant stakeholders, in relation to road maintenance.This will be done through the development of maintenance standards, an evaluation system for tracking contractors’ performance, and islandwide dissemination of the programme’s information.Activities undertaken up to February 2013 include: consultancy engagement to establish the Land Transportation Authority; partial completion of development and training for routine road maintenance micro-enterprise; partial development of a monitoring and evaluation system; and partial completion of the design and implementation of a road emergency attention system. These are among the activities earmarked for completion during 2013/14.The programme is being jointly funded by the Government of Jamaica and the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), and is scheduled for completion by March 2014.By Douglas McIntosh, JIS Reporterlast_img read more

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