Roger Federer on Rafael Nadal: I’m a better player because of him

first_imgRoger Federer entered another record book as he became the most decorated Laureus Awards winner after winning both the Sportsman of the Year and Comeback of the Year in Monaco.Federer had an incredible 2017 where he came back from a six-month injury layoff in 2016 and won the Australian Open after an epic five-setter against Rafael Nadal. He went on to win the Indian Wells, Miami Open, Halle Open, his eighth Wimbledon title and Shanghai Masters last year. He began 2018 with his Australian Open title defence before becoming the oldest world No.1 at Rotterdam Open.ALSO WATCHDespite Nadal having his own incredible comeback last year, where he ended the year as the world No.1, injuries have marred the beginning of this year for him. Federer received his award and gave a “shoutout” to Nadal and thanked him for making the Swiss a better player.”I just want to give a shoutout to him (Rafael Nadal). He had an unbelievale year himself. We had a great battle and it’s because of him, a guy like him I feel I have become a better player as well. He could very well be here as well tonight standing here with this award. He’s an incredible player, incredible friend, incredible athlete. So just like to give a shoutout to him,” Federer said after receiving the award.Federer and Nadal have been on-court rivals for a decade now but the off-court friendship is as famous as their tennis battles. In the inaugural Laver Cup last year, Nadal and Federer also teamed up to play a men’s doubles match for Team Europe and won the match.advertisementFederer won his fifth and sixth Laureus statuettes to become the most decorated winner in the awards’ history.”I’d like to thank all my coaches for giving me the chance to be here tonight, from the junior days to all the way tonight. It’s an absolute privilege to take this award from the Laureus Academy.”I still feel I got injected with a lot of young injury through my injury actually and my four kids, who I love so much and can’t thank enough for making life on tours so fun really. My wife, my parents, they are amazing.”Another tennis player, Serena Williams of the US, won the Sportswoman of the Year Award following her 23rd Grand Slam title at Australian Open 2017.With five Laureus statuettes in hand, Williams, is now the most decorated female Laureus Awards winner.Italian football legend Francesco Totti received the Laureus Academy Exceptional Achievement Award for his 22-year contribution to Roma.He also joined Wales manager Ryan Giggs as the newest members of the Laureus World Sports Academy.last_img read more

IPL 2018, RR vs KKR: Rajasthan eye 3rd straight win, Kolkata look to go top

first_imgRajasthan Royals will look to continue their winning run when they taken on Kolkata Knight Riders at home in the Indian Premier League (IPL) on Wednesday. On the other hand, Kolkata have the opportunity to move to the top position in the league table with a win.After losing the season opener Sunrisers Hyderabad, Royals have turned it around with back-to-back wins. They beat Delhi Daredevils by 19 runs in a rain-truncated encounter and then travelled away to post a convincing 19-run victory over star-studded Royal Challengers Bangalore.The undisputed star of the game was Sanju Samson who hit a blistering 45-ball 92 and Royals would expect him to fire again. They were able to iron out few of their flaws. Royals’ batting clicked with Samson leading the charge and skipper Ajinkya Rahane too making a useful contribution. Their bowling too could sustain the pressure of onslaught by big hitters like Virat Kohli and AB de Villiers. If Kolkata Knight Riders win, they will go on top of the points table. (BCCI)Kolkata began their campaign with a big win against RCB but then lost two games on trot against Chennai Super Kings and SRH. They pulled their campaign back on track with a comprehensive 71-run win gainst DD.The star of the match were Nitish Rana and Nitish Rana, besides them, KKR also boast match winners like Sunil Narine, Chris Lynn, Robin Uthappa and Dinesh Karthik. Eventhough RR are playing at home, they will be wary of KKR’s firepower and depth.advertisementTheir bowling too has the right balance with the deceptive Narine, the current purple cap holder in the tournament. Wily old horse Piyush Chawla and Kuldeep Yadav are capable of weaving a web around any batting side.Pacer Shivam Mavi, who rose to stardom during the recent U-19 World Cup, and Russell provide the medium pace variety to KKR. However, the tight schedule of the tournament has left KKR so drained that they have preferred to rest today instead of holding a practice session.The pink city, after a two and half hour rain interruption in the previous match, is under a dry and hot spell. The wicket here is a sporting one but a little bit of dryness would help the KKR spin department.Squads:Rajasthan Royals: Heinrich Klassen, Benjamin Stokes, Jaydev Unadkat, Sanju Samson, Jofra Archer, Krishnappa Gowtham, Jos Buttler, Ajinkya Rahane, Darcy Short, Rahul Tripathi, Dhawal Kulkarni, Zahir Khan Pakteen, Ben Laughlin, Stuart Binny, Dushmantha Chameera, Anureet Singh, Aryaman Vikram Birla, Midhun S, Shreyas Gopal, Prashant Chopra, Jatin Saxena, Ankit Sharma, Mahipal Lomror.Kolkata Knight Riders: Dinesh Karthik (C and WK), Sunil Narine, Andre Russell, Chris Lynn, Robin Uthappa, Kuldeep Yadav, Piyush Chawla, Nitish Rana, Prasidh Krishna, Shivam Mavi, Mitchell Johnson, Shubman Gill, R Vinay Kumar, Rinku Singh, Cameron Delport, Javon Searless, Apoorv Wankhade, Ishank Jaggi and Tom Curran.last_img read more

When it pays to be an un-hip marketer

first_imgAre you uncool and old school? I am, apparently – at least my teenage daughter tells me so.The good news is, sometimes it pays to be un-hip. Especially if you work in marketing. I was reminded of this by Dorie Clark’s recent piece in the Harvard Business Review Blog. As she notes, sometimes the pursuit of shiny new things leads us away from basic marketing principles that work best.She says, ask yourself:1. What is everyone else doing — and how can I do the opposite? Being trendy makes you less of a standout. If every other charity is sending out calendars to thank supporters, buck the trend and give donors personal calls, for example. If everyone is zigging, zag.2. What worked in the past that’s been abandoned — and why? Some old ideas should not come back. Like the below fashion statement which I first saw via Jeffrey Forster. But we often stop effective marketing programs because staff change, people find it dull or someone drops the ball. Take a tour of your past and brush the dust off what worked before. It might work well again.3. What circumstances have changed that might allow for new opportunities? Are there old ideas whose time has come?I’m with Dorie Clark. It’s not a bad thing to eschew the shiny and embrace the dusty. Especially if it’s marketing gold. But not if it’s double denim.last_img read more

3 tips for being calmer and more creative

first_imgHBR has a nice post this week on quieting your mind – and recharging it. You can check out the whole article here, and I’ve posted a quick summary. Try one or all of these three practices:1. Mini-meditation: For 10 minutes on public transportation each morning, close your eyes and imagine a relaxing scene like a tree or waterfall. Try to focus only on that. If you drive to work, arrive 10 minutes early and do this in the parking lot. Says author Matthew May, “People who meditate show more gray matter in certain regions of the brain, show stronger connections between brain regions and show less age-related brain atrophy.” Sounds like a good reason to try this!2. Pulsing: Take breaks between stretches of 90 minutes of work. You just spent a lot of energy – now recharge for five minutes by doodling, listening to music or taking a brief stroll.3. Daydream walks: Find 20 minutes or so to let your mind wander. A lunchtime walk or morning jog are good times to try. Do not think about work but rather something you like to imagine, like a dream trip. You’re taking care of your creative brain – and the benefits will extend to all of your life.last_img read more

Why Your Emails Need a Personal Touch

first_img3. Make your email a part of a conversation.Sending your email from one person, using first-person pronouns, and including contractions will keep your note feeling conversational. If you write, “The Denver Puppy House is pleased to receive your donation,” or, “We used those funds to buy medicine,” you might come across as formal and dull. But if you write, “I am so glad you were able to make a donation to help our puppies,” or “I couldn’t have done it without you,” you’ll sound intimate and chatty. 1. Use a personalized greeting.If your friend sent you a note that said, “Dear Sir or Madam,” you might be a little confused. While you may not individually know all of your supporters, think of them as your nonprofit’s treasured partners and write to each one by name with a friendly greeting. Try saying “Hello there, Matt!” instead of “Dear Matthew.”2. Have a warm tone.Adopt a warm, welcoming tone by using simple sentences and informal language. This will help your email be breezy instead of stiff. Choosing shorter words such as “get” over longer words like “acquired” will make your email read as if from a friend. When your donors feel valued and special, they’re more likely to give again and again. One way to spread the love is by giving your emails a personal touch. Here’s how:last_img read more

10 Social Media Stats for Nonprofit Marketers

first_imgIs one of your 2014 goals to get your social strategy in order? Here are 10 fun stats on social media that can help you decide how to spend your time.73% of U.S. online adults now use social networking sites. Source: Pew Tweet this.Roughly one-third of the world’s population is now online. Source: We Are Social Tweet this.68% of Instagram’s users are women. Source: Business Insider Tweet this.50% of nonprofit communicators label social media as a “very important” communication tool. Source: Nonprofit Marketing Guide Tweet this.Tweets with images receive 18% more clicks and 150% more retweets. Source: Buffer Tweet this.71% of U.S. online adults are now Facebook users. Source: Pew Tweet this.55% who engaged with causes via social media have been inspired to take further action. Source: Waggener Edstrom Tweet this.In the U.S., users spend 114 billion minutes a month on Facebook. Source: Business Insider Tweet this.70% of YouTube traffic comes from outside of the U.S. Source: 9Clouds Tweet this.40% of Facebook users surveyed say they log in to the social network multiple times per day. Source: Pew Tweet this.Need some help thinking about how to leverage social media for your nonprofit’s outreach strategy? Download this free guide from Network for Good, Social Media Mini Guide for Nonprofits.last_img read more

7 Strategies for Mobilizing Millennials

first_img(Part two in our series on the Millennial Impact Project)Millennials: A powerful force for change.Earlier this month, I shared my perspectives on the 2014 Millennial Impact Report and MCON14. Hopefully, that post got you thinking about how Millennials are shaping our culture and social sector in profound new ways.As a refresher, this is a summary from Derrick Feldmann, President of Achieve, on the growing significance and power of Millennials:Approximately 80 million Millennials live in the U.S. today. Collectively, they spend about $300 billion annually on consumer discretionary goods. And by the year 2020, they will make up 50% of the workforce.Soon, Millennials will no longer be the “next generation;” rather, they will be the majority of your co-workers and employees. [And I’d add, the majority of your donors and supporters.]Millennials are building a culture that knows how it feels to contribute to a cause and attempt to solve social issues…It is not overstating to say that a big part of the nonprofit sector’s future relies on its ability to respond to these young people’s charitable inclinations.Invite them. Inspire them. Seven steps to get started.How do you begin to engage Millennials? Here are seven ways you can bring Millennial energy, innovation and advocacy to your organization.1. Bring Millennials onto your team. Hire Millennials. Invite one or two to join your board. Even if you have a give/get for board members, encourage Millennials to run a race or do a crowdfunding campaign as a way to fulfill their commitment. They’re worth it. With their robust social networks, youthful passion and idealism, they can contribute in ways that are more important than money. Think of Millennial team members as beacons that can shine a light on your organization with huge networks of friends, family and colleagues.2. Inspire with images and video. Shift your marketing focus from facts and data to people and impact stories. Check out how our client, the United Way of Central Maryland uses a beautiful image and video to present a clear, simple fundraising message. Click here for a guide to using visuals effectively.3. Enlist with emotion on social channels. Inspire young supporters to share your mission by capturing their attention in your social channels with emotion: empathy, humor, pain, triumph. Investments in photography and video can pay big dividends, as inspiring content is more likely to be shared. The campaign of actress Lauren Luke, Don’t Cover it Up, inspired women, especially Millennials, to confront partner violence, not to “cover it up.”4. Empower them to get involved, not just to give. Inspire Millennials to volunteer based on their top motivators for getting involved: Passion (79%); Meeting people (56%); Gaining expertise (46%). Get them involved through activism, professional groups, and leadership opportunities. The United Way of Central Maryland has built a passionate base of Millennial supporters with its Emerging Leaders United program, by focusing on these motivations.5. Focus on your website. Meet Millennials where they are: online (and on their phones). With the rise of social media, many organizations focus their online outreach, updates, and photos on these platforms, often neglecting their core website. Your website is the center of your online universe – the sun to your orbiting social media planets. And leaving out of date or generic information on a website is a major turn-off for Millennials, and everyone else!.Also, your website has to be mobile-friendly. 87% of Millennials are carrying smartphones everyday. A mobile-friendly online environment will keep mobile users engaged and enable impulsive action from an impulsive generation.6. Launch a monthly giving program. One of the hottest trends in philanthropy mirrors a trend we see in consumer purchasing: the growth in subscription giving. According to the report, 52% of Millennials are interested in giving monthly. A small monthly gift can really add up over months and years. Here are some recommendations on how to start your monthly giving program.7. Move them to action by ASKING. You’re changing lives every day. And everyday you need support. Millennials want to be inspired, to inspire others, and to make a big impact with their actions and generosity. Tell them how they can help: start a fundraising page, sign a petition, recruit volunteers, host an event, join your leadership. It starts with an ask.last_img read more

Quick-Start Guide to Data Success for Nonprofits

first_imgAll organizations generate a lot of data. The challenge is knowing what to do with it—and what it can do for you. From gathering to reporting, this quick primer will help you get started transforming raw data into insights that will help your nonprofit be more strategic.Nonprofit data fits into four general categories:Financial and internal operations data: Think basic metrics like cash on hand, expenses, volunteer hours, and staff training. These are crucial for budgeting and making program decisions.Marketing, communications, and fundraising data: Also called “outreach” data—how many people signed up for your newsletter, or the number of new donors from your latest campaign.Program data: Arguably the most crucial for articulating the effectiveness of your mission, this includes things like the number of clients your organization served and the outcomes of that service.External data: Just like it sounds, external data comes from sources other than your organization, like the Census Bureau or private research firms.Lots of options, right? And you probably have limited resources. Here’s how to narrow down which data you collect so you can get the most bang for your buck.Focus on data that helps you answer important questions.Before you begin gathering numbers, decide what you want to know. Be specific. Instead of a broad-ranging question—“Is Facebook really working for us?”—ask one that requires specific answers: “What tangible results are we getting from Facebook?” The data could be engagements per post type, new likes over time, or donations resulting from specific types of status updates. Your analysis might show, for instance, that you aren’t getting much from Facebook, but you might also learn that your organization isn’t putting much into it.Beware of “it would be interesting to know…”If you don’t have a plan to use a certain type of data, it might not be worth going down lots of little rabbit holes. It’s easy to get carried away with gathering lots of data out of free-ranging curiosity. Focus on answering those specific, measurable questions we just talked about.Now that you’ve clarified your questions, it’s time to collect the data to answer them. These tips will get you started.Get buy-in from your team.You’ll probably depend on other people to help collect data. The key is helping them understand how it will benefit them—and that it won’t just be extra work. Here’s a great example of how data analysis helps your team target its efforts where they’re effective and skip where they aren’t.How many people is your team meeting at outreach events?Of those, how many are signing up for your newsletter?Of that second group, how many are further engaging in some form, like volunteering or donating?The events generating the most people in Question 3 are the ones your team should focus on. They can skip events with the lowest numbers.Appoint a data czar.Find the person who likes to run numbers and is good at Excel. The data might live in lots of places and be viewed by lots of people, but that one person collects it and helps explain it to the rest of the team.Start small, but with big impact.If your nonprofit is shifting to being more data informed, address resistance by looking at specific key questions your group is facing and finding data to answer them.Let’s say you want to increase fundraising from individual donors but don’t know who is the most effective target. Break down one year of donor records by how they originally made contact with your organization: Maybe some participated in programs (we’ll call them “alumni”), others signed up for your e-newsletter, and others are on your board. Your data shows that alumni are giving much higher average gifts—almost double—but fewer are actually giving. You make a small shift in communications and ask alumni to give using language that reflects their relationship with you. This results in more alumni making donations because now they feel engaged and part of the community.A really simple piece of data analysis can have a big impact.Don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.In some ways, you’ll never know the full impact of your programs, but you can know how you’re doing along the way. Six months after a training, for example, call people and ask what they learned and if they made any changes because of it. You might not be able to call everyone, but you (or an intern) could call 20% or 60% of them. You can look at just a few pieces of data that will move you toward a better understanding of your impact.Record your method for Future You.When you go back to collect and report on the same type of data months or even years later, odds are you won’t remember how you did it. Write down your method in simple language so you—or someone else—can replicate it later and generate data that you feel confident comparing over time. Adapted from Network for Good’s Nonprofit 911 webinar “Data Management Strategies to Maximize Your Success” with Heather Yandow from Third Space Studio. Download the complete webinar here.last_img read more

New Study Takes a Closer Look at Which Birth Control Works Best

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on May 25, 2012June 21, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)A new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine on Thursday, May 24th, found that the effectiveness of long-acting reversible contraception is superior to that of contraceptive pills, patch, or ring. This is important news for the global health community–especially in light of Melinda Gates’ recent announcement of her decision to make family planning her signature issue and primary public health priority.From the Time Magazine article about the study:The study involved 7,486 women participating in the Contraceptive Choice Project, run by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The women, aged 14 to 45, were given their choice of contraception for free and then tracked for up to three years for unintended pregnancy. The results, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, found that longer-lasting contraceptives were up to 20 times more effective — that is, women using IUDs, implants or hormone injections were up to 20 times less likely to get pregnant — after three years than the shorter-acting methods of birth control.Read the study here.A number of news organizations have written about the study:Time Magazine, Which Birth Control Works Best? (Hint: It’s Not the Pill).The Wall Street Journal, Long-Lasting Birth Control Cuts Pregnancy RateABC News, Birth Control: New Research Gives Boost to IUD EffectivenessShare this:last_img read more

Deborah Maine Asks, “Does the HPV Vaccine Make Sense?”

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on May 23, 2012June 21, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)On Wednesday, May 16th, the Maternal Health Task Force at the Women and Health Initiative hosted Deborah Maine for a seminar on cervical cancer at Harvard School of Public Health. The seminar was titled, “HPV Vaccine: Does it make sense?”Deborah Maine, an epidemiologist with a background in anthropology and over 30 years of experience working on reproductive health programs in developing countries, developed the three delays framework for understanding maternal mortality—a framework that continues to guide the work of maternal health program implementers and researchers alike.In recent years, Maine has been working extensively on the issue of cervical cancer. Her May 16th presentation focused on the controversy around priority setting for cervical cancer prevention, screening, and treatment in developing countries.Maine explains the controversy:“Even a successful vaccine program won’t help women already sexually active. Focusing only on the vaccine means writing off 2 generations of women who have already been sexually active and have already been exposed but will not benefit from this. And I wonder: Would anybody even propose a child health intervention that would take effect in 20 years? I don’t think so. I think this is something that happens preferentially with women. And I think it is a human rights issue. I really do.”A few of Maine’s recommendations:Retire the pap smear. “It is like a horse and buggy. It was great when that was all we had.”Visual inspection and DNA tests are both more sensitive, cost less, and have lower loss to follow up.Increase coverage of screening in both developed and developing countries.Focus on neglected groups.Focus on women over 30.Avoid over screening.Dr. Maine wrapped up her presentation by reminding the crowded room of public health students, researchers, and implementers of a very important point: “I would just like to remind everyone that 5 million women who have already been infected with HPV will die before the vaccine can have effect. Improving screening programs is the first priority in both developed and developing countries.”The presentation was followed by a lively Q&A session.Watch the video of the presentation here.Click here to read a recent paper by Maine and colleagues, Cervical Cancer Prevention in the 21st Century: Cost Is Not the Only Issue.Learn more about Deborah Maine here.Share this:last_img read more

Maternal Health, HIV, and AIDS: Examining Research Through a Programmatic Lens

first_imgPosted on June 3, 2013November 27, 2017By: Kate Mitchell, Manager of the MHTF Knowledge Management System, Women and Health Initiative; Samantha Lattof, Project Manager, Maternal Health Task Force, Women and Health InitiativeClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post is the first in a blog series on maternal health, HIV, and AIDS. To view the entire series, click here.Women and girls are increasingly and disproportionately affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic and now comprise over half of those living with HIV. According to recent estimates from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, not only is the proportion of pregnancy-related and maternal deaths attributable to HIV higher than expected, but pregnant women with HIV are eight times more likely to die than women without HIV. The feminized HIV and AIDS epidemic is one factor limiting progress in the reduction of maternal mortality. As the global community discusses bold visions for new targets to reduce maternal mortality, researchers from both the HIV and maternal health communities must come together to share knowledge and build a path to improved women-centered programming.Over the next several weeks, the Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF) will share a series of guest blog posts from our colleagues who are working in maternal health, HIV, and AIDS. The posts will cover topics such as:An exploration of a particularly groundbreaking approach used in a specific country to integrate and improve maternal health and HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment, or careExperiences managing HIV-related comorbidities and obstetric complicationsAnalyses of a persistent barrier to integrating and/or improving quality of maternal health care and HIV/AIDS care for womenCountry responses to the World Health Organization’s new guidelines for prevention of mother-to-child-transmission of HIV and antiretroviral therapy as well as country experiences in implementing these guidelinesExperiences addressing the demand side—or how to facilitate interest on the part of women and their families to demand higher quality maternal health and HIV servicesImplications for policymakers on the measurement of direct and indirect causes of maternal deaths related to HIVIn addition to the blog series, the MHTF will convene the technical meeting Maternal health, HIV, and AIDS: Examining research through a programmatic lens starting on 10 June 2013, in collaboration with USAID and CDC. The purpose of the meeting is to discuss emerging research linking maternal health and HIV, identify research gaps, and consider programmatic implications. While there is a need for significant investment in this issue around the globe, the focus of this particular meeting is Africa.Finally, our Maternal Health, HIV, and AIDS topics page highlights resources, recent publications, videos, and blog posts, along with the organizations working on maternal health, HIV, and AIDS.  The page is a work-in-progress. Please check back frequently for new content. The MHTF is always looking for new resources, research, and news.  We welcome any feedback or resources you have to share on our topics page.Stay tuned to the MHTF for upcoming blog posts about maternal health, HIV, and AIDS as well as daily summaries and a final report from the meeting. If you are interested in sharing your maternal health, HIV, and AIDS research and expertise on the MHTF Blog, please contact Kate Mitchell (kmitchel@hsph.harvard.edu) or Samantha Lattof (slattof@hsph.harvard.edu).To view the blog series, click here. For additional information about maternal health, HIV, and AIDS, visit our topic page. To follow the meeting on Twitter starting 10 June 2013, use #MHHIV.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Updates on Post-2015 Maternal Mortality Target Setting

first_imgPosted on February 26, 2014August 10, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality (EPMM) working group met in January 2014 to continue the ongoing discussion of maternal mortality targets, post-2015 and the end of the Millennium Development Goals. The group has issued a communiqué, providing additional details on the proposed targets and outlining next steps in the consultation process.The working group is planning a series of virtual and face-to-face regional consultations to spark discussion on the proposed targets and gather country-specific feedback.The proposed targets are discussed in depth in the communiqué. Additional information about the development of the targets is available on our Maternal Health, post-2015 topic page. Reactions to the proposed targets are collected in our on-going blog series.Tell us what you think about the proposed targets by joining the conversation on Twitter—using hashtag #Post2015—or contact us by email.Want to learn more and be a part of the discussion?Join the White Ribbon Alliance this Friday, February 28 for a webinar focused on setting targets to reduce maternal mortality in the post-2015 world.The first half of the webinar will focus on the process of setting global goals, while the second half will be focused on target setting for the national/country level.Betsy McCallon and Jennifer Winestock Luna will be leading the discussion and are interested in hearing your thoughts and suggestions in regards to global targets, as well as those targets for your own country.  The webinar will be documented and passed on to decision makers for further discussion on maternal mortality targets post-2015.The webinar will last from one hour starting at 9:30am EST on February 28, 2014. For more information contact Evelia Castillo.Register now to be a part of this discussion.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

“We need to talk”: How to Break Up (or Make Up) with Board Members

first_imgEditor’s note: Need help with your board? Check out these free webinar recordings from of our recent Virtual Conference: Learn to Love Your Board.Break ups are awkward, painful, and uncomfortable. Whether it’s a professional partnership or a personal or romantic relationship, it’s never easy to part ways. This is also true when it comes to “breaking up” with your board members. Have you been in this position before? Are you in it right now? Maybe you’re thinking, “My board member is giving his or her time (and in most cases, money). I couldn’t possibly ask him/her to leave. I’m just so thankful he or she is involved.”Yes, your board members are volunteers, but that doesn’t mean that you can’t hold them to certain expectations. So, what do you do when you have a board member who isn’t performing up to their fullest potential? Here’s a roadmap to help you navigate this complex situation:First, consider what a board member thinks his or her job is. Does the board have a clear job descriptions? Did you have conversations with each board member about their specific roles and responsibilities? If not, consider re-setting expectations as your next step. Review the board’s job description with your governance committee. If it’s missing any mention of fundraising or giving as a duty, suggest language that clearly states the type of gift you would like each board member to commit as well as the fundraising activities you are asking them to do. Then, develop a system to track and hold them accountable for these obligations.At a recent AFP conference, one presenter shared a report card that her organization uses with its board. It is shared privately at each board meeting and gives a “grade” for each board member’s specific duties during the fiscal year. It’s a really great tool for motivating board members and increasing their accountability.If the job duties are clear, this is probably a matter of your board member over-promising and under delivering. That means, it’s time for some tough love. Take a deep breath, exhale, and go with me on this one.Set some time to meet one-on-one with the under-performing board member. If you’d like to bring your board chair, that’s fine. Start the conversation with a sincere thank you for his or her service. Acknowledge that you understand that board leadership is a significant commitment of time and resources, and you appreciate his or her willingness to be involved.Then, share the job description and walk through the key role you need the board to play in governing and leading your organization. Point out the specific area where the board member hasn’t been meeting expectations and ask him or her if there are things you as staff could do to make his/her job easier. This is the point where you just stop and listen. How does the board member react? What does he or she say regarding his or her performance?Use your best judgement and determine if things will change after this conversation. Do you envision this board member making this position a greater priority, or is he or she the type that just can’t fit this commitment in his or her life now?If you think things will change, agree with the board member on next steps. If it’s the latter, you may consider saying something like, “It sounds like you have a lot of demands on your time, and this role may not be the best fit for you now. We need to fullest commitment of each member to lead, govern, and advocate for our work, and we understand if you are unable to fit this into your other demands.”  Then, you may offer other ways for him or her to still stay involved, like serving on a committee, or as an honorary member in some way.There’s no easy way around this conversation. But it’s an important one. I think you’ll find it will make it easier for a board member to step down gracefully.Click here to download the recordings from our recent Virtual Conference: Learn to Love Your Board.last_img read more

Medical Detailing: Teaching Providers How to Properly Use and Advocate for Health Care Products

first_imgPosted on May 11, 2015October 26, 2016By: Saundra Pelletier, CEO, Woman Care Global & EvofemClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)I am thrilled to have a discussion about the need for better metrics and measurement for establishing best practices on correct use of maternal health supplies. As organizations focus on global maternal health, we need to evaluate provider practices and use of health supplies in the countries where we work. How are we going to address the gaps without first determining what the gaps are? Are providers short on supply? Do providers choose not to use certain products because of storage requirements? Are providers trained properly on the health supplies they’re being encouraged to use?At Woman Care Global, we use an approach called medical detailing to support providers in the correct use and advocacy of women’s reproductive health supplies. Medical detailing is considered one of the few interventions capable of impacting provider performance. The core theory of medical detailing is to use support and training through frequent contact with providers to develop customized interventions to improve healthcare outcomes. Trained representatives visit medical practitioners regularly to determine the individual provider’s needs, motivations and barriers around the use of medical devices, products or services.We have utilized, and had success with, medical detailing for a program we pioneered called Maximizing Provider Healthcare Performance™, or MAX for short. MAX representatives visit over 300 healthcare providers in Kenya and South Africa to gather information about the care being given to patients. The information is collected on tablets in the field and uploaded. Through a research partner, that data is analyzed to pinpoint which specific interventions lead to enhanced care. The representatives then follow up with each provider to implement the customized interventions indicated in each situation. They also share the provider’s own analyzed data with them each quarter, in order to provide a measurement of changes in service delivery, and to identify and discuss any gaps that may have resulted in decreased performance. The whole aim of the MAX program is to raise the bar on quality care delivery.Now, I can happily talk strategy and create a bunch of flow charts about how the program works, but I want to emphasize one crucial element to the success of medical detailing. We have found the interaction between our MAX medical detailing representatives and the healthcare providers is the predominant determinant of success with both changing provider practices and collecting accurate data. Yes, the representatives are there to gather data, but they also take the time to talk, walk and drink tea with the clinicians we’re trying to reach. These interactions happen very naturally out in the field where trust and true partnership are developed over time. In an era of big data and analytics, we should never underestimate the impact of taking a minute to have a cup of tea and the value of engaging people. On a personal level, I am encouraged by programs that layer emotional intelligence and solid business practices. I am also truly and deeply encouraged by programs that take the first step and recognize that each subsequent step is meaningful.“I long to accomplish a great and noble task; but it is my chief duty to accomplish small tasks as if they were great and noble.” – Helen KellerTeaching providers how to properly use and advocate for health care products is a small task with big potential. Each woman helped will benefit and she will bring those incremental gains back to her family and her community. And that in itself is great and noble.This post is part of the blog series “Increasing access to maternal and reproductive health supplies: Leveraging lessons learned in preventing maternal mortality,” hosted by the Maternal Health Task Force, Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition/Maternal Health Supplies Caucus, Family Care International and the USAID-Accelovate program at Jhpiego which discusses the importance and methods of reaching women with lifesaving reproductive and maternal health supplies in the context of the proposed new global target of fewer than 70 maternal deaths per 100,000 births by 2030. To contribute a post, contact Katie Millar.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Putting The Lancet Maternal Health Series Into Action: Five Next Steps

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on November 2, 2016May 23, 2017By: Kayla McGowan, Project Coordinator, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Last week, experts in maternal health convened at the Wilson Center to mark the recent launch of The Lancet Maternal Health Series, discuss its implications and brainstorm how to translate findings into improvements for global maternal newborn health. The dialogue, What Next? Putting The Lancet Maternal Health Series Into Action, was part of the Maternal Health Task Force’s Advancing Dialogue on Maternal Health Series in partnership with UNFPA and the Wilson Center. Panelists included authors of the series as well as leaders in maternal health policy, advocacy and practice.Lynn Freedman, event moderator and Director of the Averting Maternal Death and Disability Program (AMDD) and Professor of Clinical Population and Family Health at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, opened the discussion by stating that the series proposes a vision of maternal health for the next era: Every woman, every newborn, everywhere has the right to good quality care. To achieve this imperative, the speakers called for the following five actions:Address diversity and divergence of maternal health.While global maternal deaths have decreased in the last quarter century, maternal deaths due to a wide range of indirect causes – ranging from asthma to obesity – have increased, which represents the growing diversity in maternal health. Furthermore, the burden of poor maternal health is far from equally distributed, which indicates increasing divergence. As Clara Calvert, Assistant Professor at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, identified, as of 2013, the pooled maternal mortality ratio (MMR) for the 10 countries with the highest levels is 200 times greater than the ratio for the 10 countries with the lowest MMRs. To improve maternal health for every woman everywhere, we must address the range of underlying causes of maternal morbidity and mortality (diversity) as well as the disparities among and within populations (divergence).Reach vulnerable women in all contexts.One of the key takeaways from the series is the “too little, too late and too much, too soon” framework, which outlines two extremes in maternal health: ‘Too little, too late’ is absent, delayed or inadequate care often linked to insufficient resources such as staff, supplies, medicines or training; ‘Too much, too soon’ represents medicalization of pregnancy and childbirth that often results in unnecessary interventions. As Suellen Miller, Director of the Safe Motherhood Program and Professor in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Health Sciences at the University of California, San Francisco, explained, we often associate maternal health care that is ‘too little, too late’ with low-income settings, but women in all settings are susceptible to receiving inadequate care. As Suellen highlighted,“Vulnerable women exist in every country… What we found is that ‘too little, too late’ also exists in high-income countries, middle-income countries and anywhere there is diversity, vulnerable women or marginalized populations.”Similarly, while the practice of ‘too much, too soon’ is considered an issue in high-income areas, over-medicalization of childbirth is a growing problem in middle-income countries as well. In fact, the world’s highest cesarean rate is in the Dominican Republic (58.9%), followed by Brazil (56.7%) and Egypt (51.8%).Prioritize quality, equity, resilience, financing and local evidence.As Marge Koblinsky, Independent Consultant, Maternal and Child Health, explained, the global maternal health community must come together to respond to the series’ call to action. This means ensuring high quality maternity care, promoting equity through universal health coverage of maternal health services, strengthening health systems, guaranteeing sustainable financing related to maternal and perinatal health and increasing the accessibility and use of local data. As Laurel Hatt, Health Finance Lead at Abt Associates, emphasized, “We need to shift the paradigm and focus on how better quality actually promotes better efficiency; investing in poor quality is the biggest waste of money.”Engage more deeply at the local level.According to Kathleen Hill, Maternal Health Lead, Maternal Child Survival Program, “If we want a system that delivers the right care for every woman, every time, [we must prioritize] the performance of a local system.” While focusing on targets and metrics related to global maternal health is immensely important, we cannot neglect the local actors on the ground. We must work with providers at the district and community levels and develop strategies to improve adherence to evidence-based guidelines and measure progress in context-appropriate ways.Put women at the center of their own care.Improvements in maternal health begin with listening to the women who receive care. As Elena Ateva, Maternal and Newborn Health Policy and Advocacy Advisor at the White Ribbon Alliance advised, we must ask women how they experience care and what they would recommend for improvements. According to Elena, “When we do this, the most amazing thing happens – these women become their own advocates!” Elena relayed stories of women who faced challenges, including lack of privacy and accessibility, while delivering in health facilities in Uganda. As Elena stated, “The voices of women, families and communities must be the starting point, not the afterthought, when we prioritize efforts at the local or national level.”Missed the dialogue? View the webcastRead more from The Lancet Maternal Health Series on the MHTF blogAccess resources from The Lancet Maternal Health SeriesCheck out the social media discussion below and join the conversation using #MHDialogue and #MaternalHealthNow.Photo Credit: Lancet Series, courtesy of the Wilson Center Maternal Health InitiativeShare this:last_img read more

The Global Epidemic of Unnecessary Cesarean Sections (Part 2)

first_imgMorocco2% (1992)16% (2011) Dominican Republic20% (1991)56.4% (2013) 4. Iran: 47.9% (2009)4. Timor-Leste: 1.7% (2009) 10. Italy: 38.1% (2011)10. Gambia: 2.5% (2010) 1. Dominican Republic: 56.4% (2013)1. Niger: 1.4% (2012) Egypt4.6% (1992)51.8% (2014) Posted on January 25, 2017January 30, 2017By: Sarah Hodin, Project Coordinator II, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Read Part 1 here.Trends over timeIn 1990, roughly one in 15 babies on the planet was born via cesarean section surgery. In 2014, one in five babies was born via cesarean. The rates have increased dramatically over the past few decades in most regions, with the fastest growth taking place in North Africa and Latin America and the Caribbean. There is substantial variation within regions, with certain countries experiencing more rapid increases than others. Highest National Cesarean RatesLowest National Cesarean Rates ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Romania7.2% (1992)36.3% (2011) 7. Colombia: 43.4% (2012)7. Nigeria: 2% (2013) Considering data and measurement limitations is important when interpreting trends. Currently, there is no standard, internationally-accepted classification system to measure and monitor cesarean rates, which presents challenges when attempting to make comparisons between locations or time periods. Despite this limitation, though, available data illustrate a clear upward trend in most parts of the world.Wide geographic variationThe highest cesarean rates are mostly found in middle-income countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, North America, Europe, Australia and Southeast Asia, while the lowest rates are found in sub-Saharan Africa. National cesarean section rates vary widely, ranging from less than 2% of births in Burkina Faso, Chad, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Niger and Timor-Leste—where many women do not have access to safe cesareans when they need them—to greater than 40% in Brazil, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Egypt, Iran, Maldives, Mexico and Turkey. CountryPrevious Cesarean Rate (Year)Current Cesarean Rate (Year) 5. Turkey: 47.5% (2011)5. Burkina Faso: 1.9% (2010) There is also wide variation within countries depending on location. For example, in the United States, facility-level cesarean rates ranged from 7.1% to 69.9% in 2009. Similarly, cesarean rates in China ranged from 4% to 62.5% in 2014 across provinces.Read Part 3 here.Graphs and adapted tables from Betrán et al. The increasing trend in caesarean section rates: Global, regional and national estimates: 1990-2014. PLOS One 2016; 11 (2): e0148343.—Read a statement about the prevention of primary cesareans from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine.Share this: 8. Maldives: 41.1% (2011)8. Guinea-Bissau: 2.3% (2010) China4.4% (1990)36.2% (2011) 3. Egypt: 51.8% (2014)3. Ethiopia: 1.5% (2011) 6. Mexico: 45.2% (2012)6. Madagascar: 1.9% (2013) Mexico12.4% (1987)45.2% (2012) Colombia16% (1990)43.4% (2012) Georgia3.8% (1990)36.7% (2012) Turkey8% (1993)47.5% (2011) 2. Brazil: 55.6% (2012)2. Chad: 1.5% (2010) 9. Uruguay: 39.9% (2012)9. Guinea: 2.4% (2012)last_img read more

Josh Groban Performs At Culture For Ones Fifth Annual Benefit

first_imgOn the evening of Monday, April 3rd, NYC’s prominent philanthropists, as well as those involved in the arts, entertainment, and fashion came together at espace for Culture For One’s Fifth Annual Benefit which raised $290,000 to provide the under-served youth in NYC’s foster care system with access to the arts.Josh Groban Performs At Culture For One’s Fifth Annual Benefit Credit/Copyright: Patrick McMullanWABC news anchor Sade Baderinwa served as the emcee for the evening, which also included three riveting performances from Josh Groban and the cast of The Great Comet of 1812. Diana and Joe DiMenna were honored with the Culture For One Inspiration Award for arts and entertainment leadership and their dedication to the organization.Comedian Caroline Rhea provided comic relief while raising additional funds for the silent auction that included top items such as a VIP concert package to attend Bruno Mars’ much-anticipated upcoming show, a Chuck Close self-portrait, and a photoshoot with legendary photographer Arthur Elgort and stylist to the stars Ann Caruso.Notable attendees included Alexandra Richards, Patti Hansen Richards, Caroline Rhea, stylist Ann Caruso, fashion designer Frederick Anderson, filmmaker Shruti Ganguly, Harold Koda, jewelry designer Joan B. Horning, Susan Clatworthy, Hofit Golan, and Susan Shin.The benefit chairs for evening included Jennifer Bandier & Neil Boyarsky, Patrice Bugelas-Brandt & Bill Brandt, Denise LeFrak Calicchio, Lenore & Bob Cohen, Janet & Howard Kagan, Shelley Lazar, Linn Tanzman & Sanford Rosen. In addition, the benefit committee for the evening was Jessica & Todd Aaron, Robin & John Abbott, Jenessa & Brent Banks, Julie Farmer & Scott Lazarus, Fran & Andrew Gelman, DO, Amy & Richard Goldman, Lorna Hyde Graev, Susan & Jason Kasarsky, Nancy Klein & Michael Brodman, MD, Lizzy & Bryce Markus, Carolyn Minick Mason, Randi Rossignol, Eileen Schein, Natasha Schlesinger, Pamela & Steven Sinderbrand, Kate & Shai Waisman, Nina Weinstein.Guests were inspired when Culture For One founder and executive director Linn Tanzman took the stage to tell the story of how the organization was founded. Throughout her career, Linn held multiple high-profile corporate positions in the music, media, beauty and fashion industries. One day, Linn began to feel her calling to work with children and as time went on, she began to think about her own “legacy,” realizing that she wanted to give back to the city that had served her so well. She left her corporate career to pursue this passion that spoke to her heart and soul. While volunteering with an organization that supported children living with HIV / AIDS, she learned about becoming an interim care provider to foster infants. Since 2009, Linn has fostered thirteen babies as a Spence-Chapin interim care provider. With time, she realized that those babies, who are on their way to their “forever families”, are the lucky ones. It is the children who spend time in foster care who are the most overlooked. This sparked the idea to take one foster child to a Broadway show, which made her realize that what most foster children need are genuine connections with adults that makes them feel valued and important opportunities to help with their development. Linn decided that although she was only one person, what she could offer local foster children was this type of connection through exposure to New York City’s vast cultural offerings, and thus Culture For One was born.Following Linn’s poignant speech, former foster youth and Culture For One participant Jahlika Hamilton brought the crowd to tears – and received a standing ovation with her deeply emotional recount of the positive impact that Culture For One has had on her life, and how the organization helped create new happy memories for help her overcome the hurt and many challenges she faced being in the foster care system.last_img read more

Tips for changing how your business searches for staffers

first_imgNEW YORK — Many small business owners are changing how they look for staffers because the tried-and-true methods may no longer work with a shrinking labour pool and changing work force demographics.Here are some tips from owners and HR professionals:— Keep at it. “Recruiting has to be a daily part of your business. If you wait until you need people, you’re going to end up in trouble,” says Andy Pittman, CEO of ShelfGenie, a franchise company that designs and installs shelving for homeowners.Owners should also have a list of people they’re interested in hiring, even if they don’t openings, says Michael Timmes, a consultant with HR provider Insperity, He suggests combing websites like LinkedIn to find possible candidates.— Look for off-the-beaten-track ways of finding potential candidates. Pittman suggests taking rides with Uber or other car services and chatting with drivers, many of whom are working several jobs. They might be interested in something different or with steadier hours.— Be flexible about the interview process. Sam Cross, who owns Broad Street, a home care agency, is willing to travel to where his potential hires are instead of having them come to his Chicago office. And he’ll meet with them on weekends if necessary.“We’re not going to let anything stop us from figuring out how we can meet them as quickly as possible,” he says.— Be honest about your company. Adam Stetzer has some of his staffers meet with top job candidates, and gives the employees carte blanche to discuss the company’s problems as well as its upsides. Stetzer, owner of digital marketing company HubShout, doesn’t want something about the business to make a new hire leave.“They’re going to learn about it anyway,” he says._____For more small business news, insights and inspiration, sign up for our free weekly newsletter here: http://discover.ap.org/ssb_____Follow Joyce Rosenberg at www.twitter.com/JoyceMRosenberg . Her work can be found here: https://apnews.com/search/joyce%20rosenbergJoyce M. Rosenberg, The Associated Presslast_img read more

92M contract awarded to expand Corpus Christi Ship Channel

first_imgCORPUS CHRISTI, Texas — An Illinois company has won a $92 million contract to deepen and widen the Corpus Christi Ship Channel to accommodate larger oil tankers.The Port of Corpus Christi on Thursday announced the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers selected Great Lakes Dredge & Dock Company. The federal government and the Port of Corpus Christi are funding the overall $360 million ship channel project.Plans include expanding the Corpus Christi Ship Channel from the Gulf of Mexico to Harbor Island. The depth would increase from 47 feet (14 metres) to 54 feet (16 metres) from the jetties at the entrance to the channel.The project comes amid replacement of the Harbor Bridge, which opened in 1959 and has a 138-foot (42 metres) clearance, with a larger span.The Associated Presslast_img read more

Properties in JK Pak identified for attachment

first_imgNew Delhi: At least 10 properties of a Jammu and Kashmir-based businessman, an Islamabad house of Hizbul Mujahideen chief Syed Salahuddin and a host of immovable assets of separatists have been identified by security agencies for attachment in multiple terror financing cases, officials said Monday.The 10 properties of Zahoor Ahmad Shah Watali, currently in Delhi’s Tihar jail in a terror funding case probed by the NIA, and Salahuddin’s house in a prime location in the Pakistan’s capital city are under the scanner of the agencies. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’The federal probe agencies like the Enforcement Directorate, the National Investigation Agency and the Income Tax Department will soon initiate steps for attaching them under various criminal laws by approaching the international bodies concerned, a security official said. Watali’s properties include a single storyed house at Chhanpora in Srinagar, land at Trison City, Narbal in Srinagar, a single storyed house at Handwara, eight kanal land at Nagrota in Jammu and an under construction nursing home in Srinagar district. Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&KThe businessman’s Gurgaon house has already been attached by the ED under the PMLA. Among the other accused whose assets have been identified include one two storyed house of Farooq Ahmad Dar alias Bitta Karate, situated at Naseem Bagh in Hazratbal tehsil, and a two storyed house of Mohammad Akbar Khanday on a 2.5 kanal land at Shalteng in Srinagar. A two storyed house of Raja Mehrajuddin Kalwal located at Hamza Colony, Kenihama in Srinagar and a two storyed house of Bashir Ahmad Bhat alias Peer Saifullah at Chadoora, Srinagar are also on the list. The identification of the properties was part of the continuing crackdown on terror financiers by security agencies over the few months. Security agencies have already identified 13 people, including Hizbul Mujahideen founder Syed Salahuddin, Hurriyat leaders and businessmen, who are allegedly providing funds to terrorists and stone pelters at the behest of Pakistan spy agency ISI. The Centre has started seizing properties belonging to terror financers in a big way. Funds were provided to the leadership of Kashmir-based terrorist groups for misguiding, motivating and recruiting local youths to militant ranks, another official said. Operational activities of terror groups, including attacks on security forces, camps and convoys, are also being financed, the official said, adding money obtained through these channels are being used by major secessionist formations, especially the Hurriyat Conference. These funds are used for maintaining Hurriyat’s top leadership and a massive propaganda machinery to arouse disaffection among the people of Jammu and Kashmir against the Centre.last_img read more

Football Billy Price Denzel Ward and Nick Bosa named AFCA firstteam AllAmericans

Ohio State sophomore defensive lineman Nick Bosa (97) sacks Wisconsin quarterback Alex Hornibrook (12) in the third quarter of the B1G Championship game against Wisconsin on Dec. 2 in Lucas Oil Stadium. Ohio State won 27-21. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorThe awards continued to pile up for a trio of Ohio State players. Redshirt senior center Billy Price, junior cornerback Denzel Ward and sophomore defensive end Nick Bosa were named first-team All-Americans by the American Football Coaches Association on Wednesday.The announcement comes just two days after Price and Ward were named first-team All-Americans by the Associated Press. Bosa was on the second-team. All three were first-team All-Big Ten members.This is the second consecutive season Price has been named an AFCA first-team All-American as a right guard. The redshirt senior also took home the Rimington Trophy, given to the nation’s top center, and was named the Big Ten Rimington-Pace Offensive Lineman of the Year. During the 2017 season, Price set the Ohio State record for consecutive games started, having started every game of his career since his redshirt freshman season.Nick and Joey Bosa become only the second pair of Ohio State brothers to both be named first-team All-Americans, joining Ray and Archie Griffin. Nick has continued the legacy of the Bosa name, joining Joey as fellow Big Ten Defensive Lineman of the Year winners by taking home the hardware in 2017. Bosa has 32 tackles — 18 solo and 14 assisted — with 14.5 tackles for loss and seven sacks. He also forced a fumble.Ward has shined in his first year as a starter, picking up two interceptions, 15 passes defended, 30 solo tackles, seven assisted tackles and two for a loss. He was named a finalist for the Thorpe Award, given to the nation’s top defensive back, but lost to Alabama safety Minkah Fitzpatrick. read more

ThreePeat Kassiks Takes Home Third Consecutive Win At Beer And Barley Wine

first_imgFacebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Kassik’s Brewery once again took home first place at the 2018 Great Alaska Beer and Barley Wine Festival with their Buffalo head Barley Wine. Debara and Frank Kassik opened the brewery in North Kenai in 2006, and this year they defended their 2016 and 2017 title with their Buffalo Head Barley Wine win. Kassik’s Brewery is the result of Debara purchasing a home brew kit for her husband Frank for Christmas a few years back. Frank’s passion for brewing began and soon he became a proficient home brewer. In 2004 Frank and Debara spent the summer building a 36×50 shop while working their regular jobs with the hope of building a brewery. The Great Alaska Beer & Barley Wine Festival was held on January 19 & 20, in Anchorage. According to their website, the brewery opened its doors on memorial weekend 2006 with the Beaver Tail Blonde and Moose Point Porter. The Moose Point Porter was one of Frank’s home brew recipes scaled up for the brewery. Never in the twenty-four year history of the festival has a three-peat been accomplished. The festival featured over 300 beers, meads, and ciders from 70 brewing establishments located her, nationally, and globally. Frank Kassik, the head brewer for Kassik’s: “The winner for this years was a very small amount, only about 106 gallons and that was it. We actually did brew a second barley wine, which we have on sale that is very close to the winner, but what we do have available is a very small amount. You’re just going to have to come see us.” This is the third year in a row that Kassik’s has taken home first place, and makes Kassik’s the first brewery ever to win back to back first place medals three times in a row. Story as aired:Audio PlayerJennifer-on-Kassiks-three-peat-1-1.mp3VmJennifer-on-Kassiks-three-peat-1-1.mp300:00RPdlast_img read more

Louisville Football Names McKenzie to Coach Running Backs

first_imgMcKenzie earned an undergraduate degree in secondary education, political science, and American history in 2005. He completed his master’s degree in education at Vanderbilt in 2010. LOUISVILLE, Ky. – The University of Louisville football program has hired Norval McKenzie as its running backs coach, head coach Scott Satterfield announced on Tuesday. McKenzie is the father of one daughter, Anaya, and he and his wife Amber have a son, Storm.MCKENZIE AT A GLANCE2006-07: Hiram (Ga.) H.S. (assistant coach)2008-09: Vanderbilt (graduate assistant)2010: Vanderbilt (assistant recruiting coordinator)2011-15: Furman (running backs/special teams coordinator/recruiting coordinator)2016-18: Arkansas State (running backs) McKenzie helped lead Furman to a 2013 SoCon championship and several victories over FCS nationally-ranked teams, including No. 5 Wofford in 2011. The Paladins also knocked off then-FCS member and No. 3-ranked Appalachian State in 2011. Story Links Before his stint at Arkansas State, McKenzie spent five seasons at Furman, serving as the running backs coach, special teams coordinator and recruiting coordinator. The 2008 season saw him help Vanderbilt post its first winning season (7-6) since 1982 and a 16-14 victory over Boston College in the Gaylord Hotels Music City Bowl – the program’s first bowl victory since 1955. McKenzie assumed the duties of assistant recruiting coordinator, while also helping with player development and coordinating the Gridiron Club for former Commodore letter winners, in 2010. A Powder Springs, Ga., native and former football standout at McEachern (Ga.) High School, McKenzie was a four-year football letterman for Vanderbilt (2001-04), where he rushed for 1,411 career yards. He battled back from a serious leg injury his sophomore year to lead Vanderbilt in rushing as both a junior and senior. Last season, McKenzie’s running backs were an integral component of the offense that averaged 186.4 yards on the ground, guiding the Red Wolves to an 8-5 record and a win over Nevada in the Arizona Bowl. McKenzie tutored two of the Sun Belt’s top-10 rushers in Marcel Murray and the league’s Freshman of the Year Warren Wand. McCloud, who completed his career ranked 10th in Furman rushing history, garnered all-conference recognition in 2013 after running for 1,110 yards and five scores. Triston Luke rushed for 385 yards and a pair of scores in 2015 to find a place on the league’s All-Freshman team, while Marcus Anderson earned the recognition in 2013 when he posted 334 rushing yards and two touchdowns.center_img Alma Mater: Vanderbilt, 2005Hometown: Powder Springs, Ga.Wife: Amber (Falcone)Daughter: AnayaSons: Storm Print Friendly Version While coaching at Furman, McKenzie instructed a pair of All-Southern Conference running backs and two others who were named to the league’s All-Freshman team. Jerodis Williams was a two-time All-SoCon choice after rushing for 2,225 yards and 20 touchdowns over his junior and senior campaigns, in addition to earning All-America honors in 2012 when he led the FCS in kickoff returns (35.9 avg., 2 TDs). Before joining the Louisville staff, McKenzie spent the last three seasons as the running backs coach at Arkansas State. Following graduation, he began his coaching career at Hiram (Ga.) High School, working two seasons there before returning to Vanderbilt as a graduate assistant coach for the 2008 and 2009 campaigns. Playing Experience2001-04: Vanderbilt (RB) Murray, who finished seventh in the Sun Belt in rushing, ran for 860 yards and eight scores, while Wand totaled 792 yards and four touchdowns to help the Red Wolves finish fifth in the conference in rushing. Wand closed his career finishing in the top 10 in school history in rushing yards. In McKenzie’s first season in 2016, the Red Wolves won a Sun Belt Conference championship with a 7-1 record and defeated UCF 31-13 in the Cure Bowl. During that campaign, Wand and junior Johnston White combined to rush for 1,351 yards and 12 touchdowns. Wand, a second-team all-conference honoree, rushed for a team-high 879 yards, while also posting 24 receptions for 279 yards and three more scores. McKenzie’s impact was felt during his second season, helping the Red Wolves rank No. 10 in the nation in total offense, averaging a school-record 494.8 yards per game. The unit also accounted for 10 combined touchdowns as the team ranked No. 13 in the country in scoring offense with 37.8 points per game. In that season, Wand and Johnson combined for 1,145 yards and nine touchdowns. last_img read more