FastPass+ Availability at Walt Disney World – Update 2

first_imgShare This! This is the third blog post on day-of FastPass+ availability. The first blog post was in 2014, and the second in 2015. In the three-plus years since FastPass+ was introduced at Walt Disney World, we have been tracking the availability of FastPass+ reservations. The last major change in the FastPass+ process is the that you can reserve additional FastPass+ reservations through Disney’s MyDisneyExperiance app. This is a significant improvement over having to stand in line at in-park kiosks. This also means that additional FastPass+ reservations are being grabbed up by more guests. For FastPass+ overview, tips, and advice go to https://touringplans.com/walt-disney-world/fastpass.By using the FastPass+ system, we and others have observed that reservation slots can come and go quickly. The tables below show the average time when availability runs out. It is possible that a FastPass+ reservation may pop up, but it is unlikely. The gray cells show the number of days in advance that FastPass+ reservations sell out. A reasonable assumption would be that as crowds increase, the time when FastPass+ reservations run out would decrease. This holds up for the headliner attractions, but not so much for the lower tiered attractions. For the lower tiered attractions, the FastPass+ depletion time is more a function of when the park closes than the crowd level. The data also support the theory that Disney holds back some FastPass+ reservations for day-of guests: even if you see no availability in advance, you may find that availability once you’re in the park.Just like dining reservations, a FastPass+ reservation may be available but it may not be a desirable time. A 1 am Dumbo FastPass+ reservation is not going to be very useful if your family is sleeping. The earlier you make a  reservation the more options will be available.A handful of attractions has little to no same day availability. The good news is that almost all attractions have some availability a few days before your visit. Frozen Ever After and Seven Dwarfs Mine Train are the only attractions that sell out very early. It can be very difficult to get FastPass+ reservations for these two attractions 30-days prior to your visit.Pandora – The World of AvatarPandora opens May 27, 2017, and there will be two new attractions. They will have FastPass+ queues. Guests can only choose one of the two attractions to make an advance FastPass+ reservation. The initial data is showing that Avatar Flight of Passage is selling out before Na’vi River Journey. The attractions are not selling out as fast as Frozen Ever After or Seven Dwarfs Mine Train. If you can make FastPass+ reservations 30 to 60-days prior to your visit you should be able to get a Pandora attraction FastPass+ reservation.last_img read more

BlackBerry Embraces Android, But Promises Not To Leave Developers Out In The Cold

first_imgAfter months of rumors, BlackBerry CEO John Chen confirmed rumors that the Canadian smartphone maker was releasing a keyboard-equipped phone running the Android operating system. It’s called the Priv, for “privilege” and “privacy.”“What’s unique about our Android phone is that we are collaborating with Google to bring the best of BlackBerry security and productivity to the Android ecosystem,” Chen wrote in a post on BlackBerry’s company blog.Fork You, DevelopersWith this move, BlackBerry is making an already mixed message to developers more muddled. Chen said BlackBerry would continue to support and develop the BB 10 operating system. Yet BlackBerry has also been encouraging developers to write apps for Android and then adapt them for newer BlackBerry devices. The result is a lot of low-quality apps.BlackBerry’s most devoted developers haven’t been excited by Android. One developer, who goes by the username helex on BlackBerry’s developer forums, wrote in August:I personally use BlackBerry because it is not Android and a lot more advanced and “more open” than iOS. So from this personal aspect I’m not interested in Android and in case BlackBerry10 goes “END OF LIFE” (which I don’t belive since many enterprise and gouvernment customers are relying on it) I would need to search a new platform to play with, to use and to target my own apps on. But we’re still far away from there, yet.That’s BlackBerry’s challenge in a nutshell. The Priv won’t appeal to its most loyal developers—a small but vocal group, who are often creating special-purpose business apps for customers who standardized on BlackBerrys in their workplaces. See also: Why Android Won’t Save BlackBerry, And BlackBerry Can’t Help AndroidThe Priv will, however, have access to the far larger pool of Android developers, who won’t have to learn a new set of tools for adapting their Android apps to run on BlackBerry’s proprietary BB 10 operating system.It all seems too little, too late. BlackBerry’s trading on the affections of consumers who cherish the BlackBerry brand and physical features like the keyboard, while confusing developers who make the apps on which smartphones live or die.Screenshot via BNN.ca owen thomas Related Posts Why Your Company’s Tech Transformation Starts W… Tags:#Android#BB 10#BlackBerry#BlackBerry 10#BlackBerry Priv#enterprise mobile apps#mobile apps center_img How AI is Learning to Play with Words Leveraging Big Data that Data Websites Should T… These Mistakes Can Derail a Legacy Software Con…last_img read more

Ireland have new plans for All Blacks in quarter-final, says Cian Healey

first_img Since you’re here… Share on Messenger Share on Twitter “I don’t know, you will have to ask him,” said the All Blacks attack coach, Ian Foster, when asked how Farrell managed to find ways of stalling New Zealand’s turbo-charged engine. “He does a job based on what he sees and so do we. We are assuming based on past behaviour that they will come up with a plan that they think is good enough to beat us. Will that involve some special plays? Probably.”Make that definitely. “We have some new stuff that we have not done before,” the Ireland prop Cian Healy said. “We have beaten them a couple of times in the last few years but this is a World Cup quarter-final. It is different.” Asked if it was the biggest match of his career, he replied: “Definitely. It is a do-or-die game. We all understand that.”It took Ireland 111 years to defeat the All Blacks but they have won two of their past three Tests against a side aiming to win a third successive World Cup. Their coach, Joe Schmidt, who is standing down after the tournament, came up with a set-piece play last November that the New Zealander had borrowed from the All Blacks and does not want this phase of his career to be ended by his compatriots.“I am sure Ireland will be primed and ready,” Foster said. “We were beaten by a good team last November, but that was a different time, a different place. Is it relevant? We don’t get stuck in the past: it is more about the excitement of the challenges in front of us. This is a week we have been preparing for a long time. It is where you really test yourself.”Ireland suffered a blow this week when their centre Bundee Aki was suspended for three weeks after being sent off last week against Samoa for a high tackle. They are waiting for the written report from the disciplinary panel before deciding whether to appeal, but on past precedent this tournament their chance of success would be remote. Rugby World Cup 2019 Read more Preparing to face New Zealand tends to keep defence coaches up all night. Since the last World Cup, the holders have scored 267 tries in 49 Tests, armed with attacking invention only Japan are able to rival.The All Blacks have failed to score a try in only two of those games, against the 2017 British & Irish Lions in the second Test and in Dublin last November when Ireland defeated them 16-9. The common denominator was Ireland’s Andy Farrell, the defence coach jettisoned by England after the 2015 World Cup, who is again plotting the downfall this weekend of a side last defeated at a Rugby World Cup in the 2007 quarter-final against France. … we have a small favour to ask. More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many new organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Support The Guardian The Breakdown: sign up and get our weekly rugby union email. New Zealand rugby union team Ireland rugby union team Share on Pinterestcenter_img Rugby World Cup Topics Share via Email Rugby union Share on Facebook Homeward bound: The lesser known lights who shone in World Cup pool stages Share on LinkedIn Share on WhatsApp news “Bundee is nowhere near a dirty player and he was upset about the decision, rightfully so,” said the Ireland forwards coach, Simon Easterby. “Until we have seen the report and know how the panel came to that decision, we cannot make any further comment while preparing for the match on the basis that he will to be available.”Easterby said that the key to success in their first World Cup meeting against New Zealand since 1995, when Jonah Lomu announced himself on the world stage with two tries in Johannesburg, would again be defence against a side adept at the counter-attack that is averaging 5.4 tries a match in the last four years.“We will need to be on the money without the ball,” said Easterby. “They have so many threats across the park that you cannot switch off for a minute. We cannot afford to give them any soft turnover opportunities and will have to be fully on our game.” Reuse this contentlast_img read more

3 tips for being calmer and more creative

first_imgHBR has a nice post this week on quieting your mind – and recharging it. You can check out the whole article here, and I’ve posted a quick summary. Try one or all of these three practices:1. Mini-meditation: For 10 minutes on public transportation each morning, close your eyes and imagine a relaxing scene like a tree or waterfall. Try to focus only on that. If you drive to work, arrive 10 minutes early and do this in the parking lot. Says author Matthew May, “People who meditate show more gray matter in certain regions of the brain, show stronger connections between brain regions and show less age-related brain atrophy.” Sounds like a good reason to try this!2. Pulsing: Take breaks between stretches of 90 minutes of work. You just spent a lot of energy – now recharge for five minutes by doodling, listening to music or taking a brief stroll.3. Daydream walks: Find 20 minutes or so to let your mind wander. A lunchtime walk or morning jog are good times to try. Do not think about work but rather something you like to imagine, like a dream trip. You’re taking care of your creative brain – and the benefits will extend to all of your life.last_img read more

Today is Be Your Donor Day

first_imgToday is Network for Good’s official Be Your Donor Day. Today is the day all nonprofits should review their digital fundraising channels through their donors’ eyes. Of course, while every day should be Be Your Donor Day at your organization, we want to encourage all fundraisers to devote some time today to experiencing their outreach and donation process from their donor’s perspective. A third of all online giving will happen in December—now is the time to make sure your donors will have an easy giving experience that inspires and delights them. Don’t let your hard work of creating a great year-end fundraising plan go to waste! Make it your mission to find and fix any problems that may trip up your donors before the busiest giving days of the year. So, what can you do to celebrate Be Your Donor Day? Here are some suggestions:— Visit our Be Your Donor Day headquarters for donor-centric fundraising resources, including a Be Your Donor checklist and year-end fundraising guide.— Pledge to set aside time to view your entire fundraising and donation process from your donor’s perspective.— Put on your “donor hat” and make a donation, submit a contact form on your website, and call your main phone line. What happens? Is the process what you’d expect? Is it easy?— Ask a friend or family member (someone not overly familiar with your organization) to help you test your website and donation page.— Join the conversation on Twitter with the hashtag #BeYourDonor.We asked a few of our friends in the nonprofit space to share their suggestions for Be Your Donor Day. Read on and check out their amazing tips:Kivi Leroux Miller wants you to rethink your newsletter strategy. Make it a valuable resource for your donors.Social Media for Nonprofits co-founder Darian Rodriguez Heyman recommends you follow the Burrito Principle when timing your social media posts. Post important updates when your donors and supporters are most likely checking their feeds.Mark Rovner and Alia McKee of Sea Change Strategies encourage fundraisers to consider the appreciation you show your donors. Would your organization pass the Bulls-Eye Test?Joanne Fritz suggests you view your website from the donor perspective. In addition to having a nice, clean layout with a prominent DonateNow button, your website should also strive to answer your donor’s most important questions.Form connections and get to know your donors, supporters and prospects, says Nancy Schwartz. Do donors feel connected to you and your organization?Big Duck’s Farra Trompeter shared this gem from last year’s Be Your Donor Day: make sure your donors love you! Here are 11 ways donors show you they care about your organization. Take the pledge to Be Your Donor and make your emails, donation page, website, and social media more donor friendly!I’d love to hear your ideas — share how you plan to “Be Your Donor” in the comments below.last_img read more

How to Get Your Board on Board with Online Fundraising

first_imgIf you’re a fundraiser who is struggling to get your executive director or board to understand why you should launch an online fundraising program or invest more in online giving tools, try these talking points to help plead your case.Online giving boosts individual giving.You might have experienced push back on launching online fundraising because your leaders want to focus more on grants and major gifts from foundations. Remind them that individual giving is the biggest slice of the fundraising pie, and online fundraising is a key way to help diversify your funding. Having an online presence (and a way to give online) will help you recruit and retain donors who are likely shifting away from writing checks.Online giving allows you to interact with your donors where they are—online.Are your board members questioning how many of your target donors are really online? Send them these statistics from Pew Research:· 85% of American adults use the Internet· 61% of Internet users bank online · 73% of American adults use social mediaWhen potential donors find your nonprofit on social media or through a Google search, you’ll miss out on gifts without an easy online donation option. If you don’t make it simple for donors to support your mission, they may think you don’t need help! You don’t have to set up a merchant account.Contrary to popular belief, you don’t have to set up a merchant account, payment gateway, or other fancy money-processing component to accept online donations—and you don’t have to be a tech whiz, either. In 2001, Network for Good made it easy for donors to give to any registered 501(c)3 online. Thirteen years and $1 billion dollars later, we still make it easy! You can get up and running with a branded donation page over your lunch hour.It’s not just a fad.Every year online giving continues to grow. Organizations like Crowdrise and Causes have leveraged the power of social networks to help encourage peer-to-peer giving. National giving campaigns like Giving Tuesday and Give Local America are here to stay. Wonder how areas affected by natural disaster get the instant funds they need? The answer: through online giving disaster relief campaigns. Consider these four conversation starters the next time you bring up online fundraising with your board. What other things do you want to teach your board about online fundraising? Do you have advice for those who are still trying to convince their leaders? Share your thoughts in the comments section.This post was created as part of this month’s Nonprofit Blog Carnival. The roundup of February’s submissions will be featured on The Fundraising Coach blog later this month.last_img read more

Don’t Like the Answer You’re Getting? Change the Question

first_imgAs the volunteer coordinator for Gift of Life Michigan, Kim Zasa sent volunteers to church fairs and festivals in the hope that people would want to become organ donors. Although she had 800 volunteers attending countless events, only 11% of Michigan’s residents were organ donors. Today that number is about 33%.So what changed? How did Gift of Life Michigan recruit so many new donors?According to a recent story on NPR, responses changed when Kim convinced the state to have DMV clerks ask customers, “Would you like to be an organ donor?” Putting your ask—and your resources—in the right place at the right time is the key to getting the results you want!1. Determine what’s not working—and be willing to experiment. Kim had an army of volunteers at her disposal who were willing to drive long distances for a cause they believed in. When she didn’t see the results she wanted, she took action. Is there an area of your nonprofit that isn’t seeing the results you’d like? Don’t just assume things will improve. Determine what’s working and what’s not, and then brainstorm about what you can do differently.2. Analyze how you’re using your resources.Instead of sending her volunteers on road trips, Kim put them to work in other ways and employed stationary DMV employees to make the ask. These clerks regularly saw almost the entire adult population of the state, so they were well positioned to speak to more people than Kim’s volunteers were.Are you using the resources you have—both time and money—to their full capacity? Are volunteers solving a pain point for you and helping you in the most beneficial way? If not, how can you modify their tasks to be more effective for your cause?3. Put your question in the right place at the right time.Instead of making the ask in places where people weren’t already making decisions beyond ice cream or cotton candy, Kim combined the ask with an established routine. If someone wanted to become a donor at a festival, they had to take multiple steps and time out of their entertainment to sign up. Making the ask at the DMV made it easy for potential donors to say yes, with no extra action required.Are you positioning your request in the best way possible? Does saying yes require multiple steps that make it less likely you’ll see the result you want? For instance, when you ask for donations online, do your supporters first have to click through multiple pages, or is it simply one click and done? Think about how you can adjust how, when, and where you’re making an ask to better your odds of getting through to your target audience. Have you tried something similar? Share your results and suggestions in the comments below!last_img read more

What Kind of Donor Gets a Thank You?

first_imgPop quiz: Who should receive a thank you?a. A recurring donor who gives $15 a month.b. A major donor who gives a $10,000 gift.c. A first-time donor who gives a $50 gift.d. A regular donor who gives a gift to a special campaign like #GivingTuesday.e. A new donor acquired through a peer-to-peer fundraising campaign.f. All donors.If you answered “f,” you’re right! Every donor should be thanked for their gift. The type of thank you will vary, but no matter the size of the gift or where it came from, every donor should get a thank you.“Should I send multiple thank you messages to a recurring giver?” Have you ever heard of anyone getting mad for receiving too much gratitude? Not very often. Recurring donors are a special group of supporters who love your cause enough to give you a financial commitment on a consistent basis. You should thank these donors as often as you see fit. If that’s an email every quarter, go for it. But listen to donors’ preferences. If a donor provides helpful feedback that the frequency of communication they are receiving is too much (or too little), take it to heart and respect their input.“Is a thank you note enough for a major donor?” A thank you note is just the first step in your donor relations strategy. In addition to a thank you note, major donors should receive an appropriate level of recognition for their gift (or the option to remain anonymous), engagement with your organization, and updates on how their gift is used. Depending on who the donor is and what the funds will be used for, the thank you should come from your executive director or board director. We aren’t discussing the importance of a phone call as a thank you in this post, but this would be the perfect opportunity for the development director to pick up the phone and chat with a generous donor.“Can the receipt serve as the thank you for a first-time donor? I doubt I’ll see them again.” It’s an unfortunate but true reality: Most first-time donors won’t return to make a second gift. But with a sound donor relations strategy that starts off with a stellar message of thanks, you could turn this one-time donor into a loyal supporter who gives year after year!“Is it awkward to send another thank you to someone who gave to a specific campaign?” Most definitely not! In this case, your thank you message should focus on how the donor was part of the campaign’s success. If the campaign is ongoing, thank them soon after the gift was made, and then send a second note of thanks to update donors on the campaign’s success. Check out this great #GivingTuesday thank you from Collective Action for Safe Spaces. Did you notice how many times the word “you” was used in this thank you message? This is an excellent example of what a donor-centric, campaign-specific thank you message should look like.“Shouldn’t it be the responsibility of the peer fundraiser to thank those who gave to their campaign?” Sure, but that doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t too. These donors gave to you because a friend asked not necessarily because they are super educated about your nonprofit. How can you show your appreciation, encourage them to stay connected to your organization, and educate them on what your nonprofit does? The best way to keep these new donors engaged is to start off the relationship right with some gratitude.Want more tips on donor thank yous? Download our newest eGuide: The Complete Donor Thank You Guidelast_img read more

Building a Global Network of Maternal Health Policymakers

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on January 23, 2013June 12, 2017By: Sandeep Bathala, Senior Program Associate, Maternal Health Initiative, Wilson CenterClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post is cross-posted from the New Security Beat.On day three of the 2013 Global Maternal Health Conference here in Arusha, Tanzania, I was joined by the Global Health Initiative’s partners to present the results of the Wilson Center’s four-year-old Advancing Dialogue on Maternal Health Series. This series is unique in its convening power, helping to bring together experts and policymakers from around the world to collaborate on a shared goal: healthier mothers and children.From 2009 to 2012, the Global Health Initiative co-convened 22 public meetings and three private workshops with the Maternal Health Task Force and United Nations Population Fund to identify challenges and discuss strategies for moving the maternal health agenda forward. In 2011, we collaborated with the African Population and Health Research Center (APHRC) to host two simulcasted videoconferences in Nairobi, Kenya, and Washington, D.C., which allowed maternal health experts and officials from both countries – including several Kenyan Parliament members affiliated with the Health Committee and Network for Population and Development – to share experiences and best practices. In partnership with the Population Foundation of India, we are planning a similar dialogue with local, regional, and national decision-makers on effective maternal health policies and programs in New Delhi, India, this year, as well as more D.C.-based meetings.By convening both in Washington, D.C., and globally, the goal of the series is to create a platform for fieldworkers, policymakers, program managers, media, and donors to share research, disseminate lessons learned, and address concerns related to policy, institutional, and organizational capacity building. These are many of the same themes being discussed at the Global Maternal Health Conference here in Tanzania.Ruthpearl Wanjiru Ngángá, APHRC’s communications manager, highlighted some of the results that emerged from the videoconferences.Broadly, she said they found that connecting maternal death to economic loss is a powerful and effective strategy, and it’s important to increase accountability by addressing the gap between what policymakers say and what they actually do to improve maternal health.All the policymakers attending pledged to do something based on what they learned at the meetings, ranging from building maternal health shelters and lobbying to working to unify the Ministry of Health in Kenya, which is currently split between ministers of public health and medical services (duplicated funds would be used to strengthen the Division of Reproductive Health).Participants also established dialogue between the ministries of health and finance to jointly identify priority areas and to ensure that 15 percent of the Kenyan national budget goes to health efforts, as per the Abuja Declaration.Perhaps the most striking pledge was made by a member of Parliament who did not attend the videoconferences but was motivated after hearing about them: He pledged to coordinate a day once a month where pregnant women in remote areas could consult with Nairobi-based doctors through e-medicine.And the commitments, it turns out, were not empty. Since the meetings concluded Ruthpearl said they have seen additional outcomes including a parliamentary retreat on maternal, newborn, and child care; increased press coverage, especially highlighting maternal and child health statistics and reporting on fatalities; and elevated interest in maternal health issues in general, including becoming a priority for the Kenya Women Parliamentary Association.“Where I come from, husbands are delivering their wives,” Hon. Sophia Abdi Noor who represents the Somali region of northern Kenya, said later in a follow-up meeting.And Hon. Farah Maalim, deputy speaker of the National Assembly, said at the parliamentary retreat that “we are running out of time towards the MDG deadline. There is need to reactivate the agenda on women and children’s health at the national level…the new constitution of Kenya declares health as a basic right for all Kenyans. Parliament has a pivotal role to play in ensuring the realization of this right.”Moving forward, Ruthpearl said APHRC intends to focus on advancing public-private health sector partnerships in urban slums and to start a pilot study on improving maternal, newborn, and child care services for slum residents. She also said they are working to improve engagement with Kenya’s National Division of Reproductive Health on research and technical working groups and to improve the visibility of research in policy and program formulation in general.Alongside Ruthpearl and I, Crystal Lander and Dr. Steve Solter of Management Sciences for Health also spoke on the panel, about their work with the Afghan Ministry of Public Health.Dr. Luc de Bernis, senior maternal health adviser at UNFPA and one of the collaborating partners in this series, concluded the session by expressing his hope that these dialogues were contributing to a swelling global advocacy movement for improved maternal health outcomes. The audience in Arusha couldn’t have agreed more.Learn more about the conference and access the conference presentations at www.gmhc2013.com. Join the conference conversation on Twitter: #GMHC2013Share this:last_img read more

The Adding Content to Contact Project: Case Studies for Implementing Antenatal and Postnatal Care in Low-Resource Settings

first_imgPosted on May 30, 2014November 4, 2016By: Annie Kearns, Project Manager, Maternal Health Task Force, Women and Health InitiativeClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)For the past nine months, the Adding Content to Contact (ACC) project at the Women and Health Initiative has been working to systematically assess the obstacles that prevent and the factors that enable the adoption and implementation of cost-effective interventions for antenatal and postnatal care along the care continuum. The project is also examining how these interventions can best be adopted and scaled up in resource poor settings to benefit women and children. As part of that process, the ACC team has been researching care delivery around the world. Today, we have published eight case studies highlighting various methods of delivering antenatal and postnatal care in a variety of settings:Focused antenatal care in Tanzania—Delivering individualized, targeted, high-quality careGroup care: Alternative models of care delivery to increase women’s access, engagement, and satisfactionHealth Extension Workers in Ethiopia— Delivering community-based antenatal and postnatal careJacaranda Health—A model for sustainable, affordable, high-quality maternal health care for Nairobi’s low-income womenLady Health Workers in Pakistan—Improving access to health care for rural women and familiesPostnatal care in Nepal—Components of care, implementation challenges, and success factorsThe Developing Families Center—Providing maternal and child care to low-income families in Washington, D.C.The Manoshi project—Bringing quality maternity care to poor women in urban BangladeshMembers of the ACC project team will be attending the ICM Congress in Prague, Czech Republic next week. These case studies will be discussed in detail during our session on Thursday, 5 June, 8:30am – 12:00pm in Room 4.3. We hope to see many of you there!Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

What the WHO and IHME Research Tells Us About Unsafe Abortion

first_imgPosted on June 18, 2014November 4, 2016By: Manuelle Hurwitz, Senior Adviser, Abortion, International Planned Parenthood Federation; Rebecca Wilkins, Programme Officer, Abortion, International Planned Parenthood FederationClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)IPPF welcomes the research released by IHME and the WHO providing new estimates of maternal mortality and its causes. The research provides a lot of food for thought and areas for discussion, in particular around the recording and reporting of data on unsafe abortion.While these findings are not directly comparable to previous estimates of maternal mortality due to unsafe abortion, currently given as 13% [1], the findings suggest that maternal deaths due to unsafe abortion have been reduced. If accurate, this is in no small part due to the tireless efforts of many service providers and advocates working around the world, often in challenging environments, to increase women’s access to post-abortion care and safe abortion services and the rise in the use of misoprostol, particularly in Latin America and the Caribbean, which may be replacing other less safe methods of “unsafe abortion”. However, the data requires closer consideration and while these new findings suggest good progress in preventing maternal deaths due to unsafe abortion, we must bear in mind that the reality is likely to be much different.The WHO research acknowledges the challenges in collecting accurate data on maternal mortality due to unsafe abortion, challenges which make it highly likely that the number of maternal deaths due to unsafe abortion are consistently under reported. In many countries, abortion is subject to legal restrictions making it very difficult for women to access the safe and legal abortion services they need. Even in countries where legislation makes abortion more accessible, stigma around the issue may result in women using methods of abortion which are unsafe. These challenges can prevent women from telling friends and family about their attempts to end a pregnancy. Therefore any maternal death resulting from unsafe abortion may not be reported as such, leading to the under-representation of this issue in its contribution to maternal mortality.It is also important to note that in this research the categorization of maternal mortality due to abortion includes all induced abortion, miscarriage, and ectopic pregnancy. While we acknowledge that this methodology was chosen due to the ICD-10 reporting category definition of deaths due to “pregnancy with abortive outcome”, we need to recognize both the limitations and the potential for misinterpretation of this categorization. The major concern is that this categorization may lead to the results of the study being communicated in such a way that unfairly and inaccurately implies that all abortions are risky. We know that when performed under the correct conditions abortion is one of the safest medical procedures and carries very minimal risks to a woman’s health and life. The complications and risks to women – which have been well documented – arise from abortions performed unsafely.These statistics highlight two things. Firstly, there continues to be a need for further research in this area looking specifically into the incidence and outcomes of unsafe abortion, to provide a more up-to-date and accurate picture on the impact of unsafe abortion worldwide. Secondly, governments need to make abortion safe, legal and accessible to all women who need it. Abortion stigma also presents a real barrier to women accessing safe abortion services, and deserves equal attention by advocates, service providers and policy makers. Only by addressing these issues, will we see further reductions in preventable maternal mortality and morbidity resulting from unsafe abortion.Efforts to achieve this took a step forward in March 2014, when global leaders signed up to a declaration calling for universal access to safe legal abortion after a key two-day meeting that was co-sponsored by Ipas, the International Planned Parenthood Federation, and the Center for Reproductive Rights.Would you like to share your thoughts on the new maternal mortality estimates? Contribute to our blog series by sending a submission of 400-600 words to Katie Millar.[1] Ahman E, Shah IH. New estimates and trends regarding unsafe abortion mortality. International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. 2011;115:121–126Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Professional Development Opportunities in Global Health

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on March 2, 2015August 10, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The Maternal Health Task Force works to build a strong maternal health community. That strength starts with you! Here are a few opportunities that you may find helpful in your career.Global Public Health Course, 10 weeks starting March 2nd, 2015: This course, developed by the Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI) a member institution of the SDSN, will focus on various aspects of public health from infectious diseases to NCDs, from health systems to big data, all while placing health as central to the broader framework of sustainable development. The course comprises of video lectures posted every week, reading material, quizzes and an interactive discussion forum, which an be completed at the student’s convenience. Faculty of the course include Prof. K. Srinath Reddy (President, PHFI), Dr. Richard Cash (PHFI/Harvard School of Public Health), Prof. Vinod Paul (All India Institute of Medical Sciences), Mr. Rob Yates (Chatham House), and others.  Further details about the course, including the course structure, requirements and syllabus can be found on the website. For any questions regarding the course, please email the course team at gphmooc@phfi.org.Because Tomorrow Needs Her, March 4th, 2015,  7:30 pm EST: A special webcast marking the launch of a multimedia campaign highlighting the efforts of Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) to provide accessible, high-quality health care to women and girls around the world. Because Tomorrow Needs Her is a collection of first-hand accounts from MSF aid workers — midwives, OBGYNs, physicians, nurses, and counselors — who have treated women and girls in a host of different countries and contexts over the past two decades. To find out more, visit the event page and the website or follow us at #TomorrowNeedsHer.Putting Mothers and Babies First: Benefits Across a Lifetime, Webcast: Last week, experts gathered to discuss the important intersections between women’s and newborn health and what integrating these two fields looks like practically. Panelists included Ana Langer with the MHTF, Joy Riggs-Perla with Saving Newborn Lives, Alicia Yamin with the FXB Center for Health and Human Rights, and Kirsten Gagnaire with Mobile Alliance for Maternal Action. In case you missed the live webcast, read a summary and watch the video at The Forum at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.Share this:last_img read more

3 Smart Year-End Email Fundraising Strategies

first_imgEditor’s note: Want more email fundraising tips? Join us on Tuesday, September 26 at 1pm EDT for a 30-minute webinar, #NFGTips: Your Email Strategy for Year-End. Can’t make that time? Register anyway and we’ll send you the recording. Click here to save your spot!In my last article I discussed the importance of getting all your year-end ducks in a row.Today we’re going to take a quack at assuring your year-end email series gets opened and acted upon.A quack at it?Yes! Because I’m guessing you don’t have your ducks lined up to make this year’s email appeal worth all your effort.  What do I mean? I mean the majority of folk receiving your email will simply hit ‘delete.’ And that’s just not going to pay your bills.You need to get all your email duckies in a row. And I know exactly which three are missing.I’ve been in that duck pond. I know where your world-wide webbed feet are taking you.You’re painstakingly wordsmithing the appeal message… agonizing over just the right tag line… angsting over which photo is the most compelling… meticulously crafting your killer call to action… thoroughly assuring your donate button link is working… worrying about your colors and type face… and distressing about how you’ll measure your results. All essential things. But your email is still going to drown.Yup. Your poor little email is just a sitting duck for that delete button.Unless… you shift some of your energy to three simple, yet too often overlooked or back-burnered, things: The “From” line The “Subject” line List segmentationLet’s Start with the “From” LineThis is arguably the most important part of your email. According to a Constant Contact study, 64% of people open emails because of the organization it is from; compared with 47% of people opening emails because of what’s in the subject line. To avoid having your precious email wind up in the trash bin, you need to use the ‘Just Ducky! ’ Rule. And the ‘From’ line is at the heart of this rule. Let me explain.When folks see an email from you in their inbox you want them thinking “That’s just ducky!  An email from _____. She always has something interesting to say.”Whose emails do you open first? Chances are good that when you open your email box a majority of the messages are of little interest to you. You don’t know who they’re from, they look like junk, or they’re coming from someone who doesn’t interest you enough to compel you to open their message.  If you have time, maybe you will.  If you don’t, maybe you’ll hit “delete.”Who the email is from is often what motivates people to open it.  Your email should come from a person or brand your targeted reader knows, trusts and, ideally, likes.  Often this will be the E.D.  It could also be another beloved staff member or lay leader. Even when you have a trusted brand, you’ll likely get a better response from the person at the brand. People give to people, not institutions. If you’re not sure about this, it’s certainly something worth testing!Don’t duck out on this responsibility, please. Think about who the email is coming from before you begin to write.  Don’t leave it until the very end. Too often no one thinks about it; then the IT person or the administrative assistant is assigned to “launch” the email. Typically they do one of two things: (1) simply launch the email from a corporate account, or (2) innocently ask “Who’s it coming from?”The first is not so good, because it’s a thoughtless approach.  The second is not so good, because it’s an afterthought (and I’ve seen more than one occasion where the appeal was delayed because it took awhile to find a signatory or to create a new “from” email account that would work).Put a feather in your cap by planning ahead so that when your reader opens their inbox they exclaim: “Just Ducky!”Let’s Make your Subject Line a Real Firequacker!The subject line is the window into your message. 33% of email recipients open emails based on the subject line alone (Source: Convince and Convert).To be a great e-mallard you’ve got to give the reader a reason to open the email. Waddle you gonna do about this? You’re gonna make your subject line one or more of these things: urgent; intriguing; exciting; specific; useful; compelling; emotional, shocking or funny (even daffy). That’s what it takes to get folks flocking to you.Here are a few real examples:Four pounds, that’s what’s up This led to email about how a food bank client had gained weight after receiving nutritious food at an on-site pantry at her senior apartments.) Intriguing/FunnyAbandoned by budget cuts, they’re counting on usThis led to e-appeal to fund home care for seniors who were losing critical lifeline services due to budget cutbacks). Urgent/SpecificWhy the cheerleaders shaved their heads This led to a message from Indianapolis Colt’s coach Chuck Pagano, who was battling leukemia. Shocking.Get into your donor’s head as much as you can, and try to make it about the donor rather than your fundraising goals. For those who’ve given in the past, how about a simple: Did you forget you made this possible? This also has the subtle psychological benefit of reminding them they already did something. (Remember, one of Robert Cialdini’s 6 Principles of Influence is “commitment and consistency.”).  Compelling. Specific. Intriguing.Is it all over between us?This was suggested by grassroots fundraising guru Kim Klein. Emotional. Compelling.You have only a few seconds to capture attention. Subject lines with less than 50 characters have open rates 12.5% higher than those with 50 or more, and click-through rates are 75% higher. So generally plan to keep your subject line to 50 characters or fewer.For more inspirations, check out some holiday email subject lines here. If you happen to use MailChimp they have a  free tool to test the strength of your subject line. They also help you add emoji’s, and they suggest words that will negatively affect your open rates – You may be surprised – two of them are: ‘Help’ and ‘Reminder.’You can find a whole duck boat-load of ideas – many of which are as good as they’re quacked up to be — in 200 More Email Subject Lines from End of Year Fundraising. Just avoid those that could be coming from any nonprofit (e.g., “Just 48 hours left” is not great. “48 hours left to rescue drowning ducks” is better).But don’t mislead. That will make you a dead duck. Folks don’t mind being teased a little, but they don’t like being lied to. If folks open your email, but then see it’s not at all about what you promised, they’ll toss you right out.While we’re at it, consider your pre-header.  That’s an extra tool to convince your subscribers to quack open your email. What is it? It’s the snippet of text at the top of your email (or a link to the online version) that your subscribers see first, sometimes even before they open the email. Because even if you get your email open, studies show that 51% will delete your email within 2 seconds of opening it.  Aargh!Most email clients display the pre-header right after the subject line. This means if you’re using images, you absolutely must include an ALT description of the image for those folks (most) whose images are blocked. Talk to your IT folk if you don’t know what I’m talking about. And keep in mind the typical inbox preview pane will only show 30 to 40 characters (the typical mobile device shows around 15 characters). So make your lead-in count.Segmentation can Make or Break your Campaign.Imagine you’re an animal rescue agency. Half of your supporters love dogs; half love cats. Wouldn’t it make sense to devise tailored messages for each segment?The same holds true for folks who gave big gifts vs. small ones. And folks who gave for the first time vs. ongoing donors.You want to tweak your appeal slightly to show people you know them.You also want to customize your asks (and your donation landing pages) to match the language in your appeal.The more specific and targeted you can be, the better.Once you get these three things nailed – “From” and “Subject Line” plus List Segmentation – getting your email opened will be like water off a duck’s back.Hasn’t this been pun? Want more email fundraising tips? Join us on Tuesday, September 26 at 1pm EDT for a 30-minute webinar, #NFGTips: Your Email Strategy for Year-End. Can’t make that time? Register anyway and we’ll send you the recording. Click here to save your spot!last_img read more

Exploring Group Antenatal Care in Low-Resource Settings

first_imgPosted on May 21, 2018May 22, 2018By: Kayla McGowan, Project Coordinator, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Amid persistent low coverage and poor quality of antenatal care (ANC) in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs)—and with recent guidelines from the World Health Organization calling for high quality ANC as well as more antenatal contacts—innovative approaches to delivering health care during pregnancy are needed. High quality ANC is not only vital to optimizing health during pregnancy, it also serves as an important touchpoint in the lives of women and families and can promote the use of health services in the future.Research in high-income countries has shown that compared to the traditional one-on-one model of ANC, group ANC—in which several women, typically of similar gestational age, gather for physical assessment, education, skill-building and peer support—can offer positive health outcomes such as decreases in preterm delivery, increased prenatal knowledge, higher rates of breastfeeding and higher engagement in care. CenteringPregnancy®, the model of group ANC for which the most evidence exists, was established to meet clinical guidelines for ANC in the United States. As such, most of the available evidence on group ANC comes from high-income countries and more research is needed to explore the feasibility, acceptability and effects of group ANC models in LMICs.A “generic” model of group ANC for low-resource settingsTo address this gap in evidence, researchers have begun exploring group ANC models in low-resource settings. A recent systematic review and evidence synthesis by Sharma and colleagues analyzed existing literature on group ANC in LMICs and extracted common attributes of models used to date in such settings. They synthesized descriptive data from group ANC experiences in 16 low and middle-income countries—derived from nine published papers and 10 key informant interviews—to develop a composite “generic” model of group care for LMIC settings. It outlines fundamental components that are consistent across all settings, as well as flexible components that may be adapted based on context. Standard components include providing a physical assessment during the group session, facilitating discussion to cultivate learning and peer support and incorporating self-care activities by women. The “generic” model includes 90-120-minute sessions with a group of 8-12 women of similar gestational age facilitated by the same two leaders (including one health care provider) for the duration of the program. Flexible components, such as the number of sessions and session content, may vary depending on the local guidelines and setting.As the authors note,“Several components of the ‘generic’ model aim to empower and support women. For example, engaging in discussion and shared care with other women of similar gestational age helps to normalize the experience of pregnancy and gives women a voice for knowledge sharing and a sense of community for support. The group format also fosters self-efficacy and social support for pregnant woman by creating a forum for participants to build skills and confidence, share experiences and resources and socialize with one another.”Adapting the model in India: Methods and resultsTo investigate whether this model would be possible and accepted by community members in an urban low-resource setting, Jolivet and colleagues conducted a feasibility study in Vadodara, a city of around 1.2 million in India, with both providers and beneficiaries. The researchers adapted the model to include four sessions (three antenatal sessions and one postnatal care session) and reflect local clinical care standards. Conducted at three different types of facilities where ANC services are commonly provided—a private maternity hospital, a public health clinic and a community-based mother and child health center—they demonstrated one session of the model to doctors and auxiliary nurse midwives, and to pregnant women and support persons. Focus group discussions, interviews and a survey collected feedback on participants’ perceptions about the group model specifically about the physical assessment, self-assessment (in which women measured their own blood pressure and weight), peer support and education components of the model as well as potential implementation challenges and solutions.According to the authors,“Ultimately, both groups of participants saw group ANC as a vehicle for delivering more comprehensive ANC services, improving experiences of care, empowering women to become more active partners and participants in their care, and potentially addressing some current health system challenges.”Overall, participants reported feeling comfortable with the physical assessment, and providers found the self-assessments to be a “novel idea… [that] helped women pay more attention and develop a feeling of ownership of their health information.” Women were enthusiastic about the model, offering solutions to facilitate its implementation, such as conducting sessions in the afternoons to accommodate women’s schedules and grouping women by common language in addition to gestational age.Despite some initial skepticism about group participation and engagement, providers found that most women were attentive and more than willing to share information and experiences with the group. Providers also expressed that the group model could meet the goals of high quality ANC while allowing more time for counseling and learning in an interactive format. As one provider reflected, “I could see that they were happy playing games and learning. It is a better way of teaching.”The findings from these studies can help drive further research testing the effects of group ANC in LMICs. The generic model suggests how researchers and programmers might approach or design group ANC in their own low-resource setting, while the feasibility study is a key step towards making group ANC accessible to women in urban India.The experiences of group ANC in low-resource settings, while limited, are quite promising. Forthcoming research will provide more insight into the effects of the group care model on coverage of recommended ANC contacts, provision of care, health system efficiency and responsiveness and—notably—women’s experiences of care.—Read the studies in full:Group antenatal care models in low- and middle-income countries: A systematic evidence synthesisExploring perceptions of group antenatal care in Urban India: Results of a feasibility study—Have you conducted research or participated in group ANC? Send us your feedback!Learn more about antenatal care>>Read about developing an adapted group antenatal care model for global implementation>>Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

LeBron Is Tired The Rockets May Soon Be Too

By Neil Paine, Chris Herring and Kyle Wagner Embed Code Welcome to The Lab, FiveThirtyEight’s basketball podcast. On Thursday’s show (May 24, 2018), Neil, Kyle and Chris discuss the conference finals yet again. Just how magical is Boston’s home-court advantage? Just how tired is LeBron James? Is the Rockets’ bench too thin for the starters to stay fresh? And what’s with Kevin Durant’s shot selection?The crew also talks about how the NFL’s new national anthem policy differs from the NBA’s in fewer ways than you might think.The Lab will be back with another episode next week. In the meantime, keep an eye on FiveThirtyEight’s NBA predictions, which are updated after every game. More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed read more

Ohio State mens hockey wins 8th consecutive game

The Ohio State men’s hockey team won its eight consecutive game Friday. The No. 7-ranked Buckeyes beat No. 11 Lake Superior State 5-2, increasing their winning streak to eight games and unbeaten streak to 10 games. With the win, OSU improved to 11-3-1 on the year, and moved into first place in the CCHA with a 8-2-1-1-conference record. LSSU falls to 10-5-2, 6-4-1-1 in the CCHA. Senior forward Danny Dries scored twice, and sophomore forwards Chris Crane, Alex Lippincott and Alex Szczechura added goals as OSU went on to win the first game in a two-game set against the Lakers. After almost two weeks off since their 6-5 win against then-No.7 Michigan on Nov. 19, the Buckeyes came out firing in the first period. Lippincott scored from the right circle to give OSU a 1-0 lead at the 12:28 mark in the opening period. Following a slashing penalty by LSSU, the Buckeyes went on the power play, and Crane took advantage, scoring with 1:04 remaining in the first period off a pass from freshman forward Ryan Dzingel. The Buckeyes outshot the Lakers 17-4 in the opening stanza and led 2-0 after twenty minutes of play. Both teams went scoreless in the second period, but LSSU had multiple scoring opportunities in front of OSU’s net. Senior goalie Cal Heeter made multiple stops and finished the game with 29 saves. Dries scored what turned out to be the game-winning goal at the 15:10 mark in the third period. Dries got the puck south of LSSU’s goal line, fired the puck off the Lakers’ goalie, and it bounced into the net, giving the Buckeyes a 3-0 lead five minutes into the final period. LSSU responded with a power-play goal with 10:17 remaining. Freshman defenseman Kevin Czuczman got the puck in the left circle and put it into the top shelf, cutting OSU’s lead to two. Szczechura scored at the 12:55 mark with an assist from sophomore defenseman Curtis Gedig increasing the lead to 4-1. LSSU would score again with 4:54 remaining, and pulled their goalie shortly after. Dries got the puck inside OSU’s blue line, and scored his second goal of the game on an empty net with 2:51 to play. The Buckeyes and Lakers will play again at 8:05 on Saturday night at the Schottenstein Center.. read more

Gas prices increase to highest amount since Nov 28

first_img KUSI Newsroom, Posted: March 28, 2019 SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – The average price of a gallon of self-serve regular gasoline in San Diego County rose today to its highest amount since Nov. 28, increasing 1.9 cents to $3.576.The average price has risen 10 consecutive days and 16 of the past 17, increasing 25.4 cents, including 4.2 cents Wednesday, according to figures from the AAA and Oil Price Information Service. It is 18.8 cents more than one week ago, 26.9 cents higher than one month ago and 5.7 cents greater than one year ago.The rising prices are the result of a reduction in supply caused by a partial shutdown of the Phillips 66 Carson refinery, planned maintenance at the Torrance Refinery and issues at at least two Northern California refineries, Marie Montgomery of the Automobile Club of Southern California told City News Service. Gas prices increase to highest amount since Nov. 28 KUSI Newsroom March 28, 2019 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

ThreePeat Kassiks Takes Home Third Consecutive Win At Beer And Barley Wine

first_imgFacebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Kassik’s Brewery once again took home first place at the 2018 Great Alaska Beer and Barley Wine Festival with their Buffalo head Barley Wine. Debara and Frank Kassik opened the brewery in North Kenai in 2006, and this year they defended their 2016 and 2017 title with their Buffalo Head Barley Wine win. Kassik’s Brewery is the result of Debara purchasing a home brew kit for her husband Frank for Christmas a few years back. Frank’s passion for brewing began and soon he became a proficient home brewer. In 2004 Frank and Debara spent the summer building a 36×50 shop while working their regular jobs with the hope of building a brewery. The Great Alaska Beer & Barley Wine Festival was held on January 19 & 20, in Anchorage. According to their website, the brewery opened its doors on memorial weekend 2006 with the Beaver Tail Blonde and Moose Point Porter. The Moose Point Porter was one of Frank’s home brew recipes scaled up for the brewery. Never in the twenty-four year history of the festival has a three-peat been accomplished. The festival featured over 300 beers, meads, and ciders from 70 brewing establishments located her, nationally, and globally. Frank Kassik, the head brewer for Kassik’s: “The winner for this years was a very small amount, only about 106 gallons and that was it. We actually did brew a second barley wine, which we have on sale that is very close to the winner, but what we do have available is a very small amount. You’re just going to have to come see us.” This is the third year in a row that Kassik’s has taken home first place, and makes Kassik’s the first brewery ever to win back to back first place medals three times in a row. Story as aired:Audio PlayerJennifer-on-Kassiks-three-peat-1-1.mp3VmJennifer-on-Kassiks-three-peat-1-1.mp300:00RPdlast_img read more

Smithsonian Honors Black Womens Bravery in HiddenHerstory

first_imgWashingtonians have a few more reasons to visit the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) as it launches a new social media campaign, #hiddenhistory, and offers four public programs to celebrate the role of women in the struggle for civil rights. Events will explore the journeys of inspiring women like Harriet Tubman and Recy Taylor and feature a combination of film, theatre, and panel presentations.NMAAHC honor Black heroes during Nationan Women’s Month (Courtesy photo)The screening of “The Rape of Recy Taylor” on Friday, March 16 appears timely as the growing national “Me Too” movement continues a conversation about about sexual assault and discrimination. The film tells the story of Taylor, a rape survivor, in 1944 Alabama, according to a Smithsonian press release. After identifying her six White assailants, her struggle is joined by the NAACP’s chief rape investigator: Rosa Parks.The museum’s Women’s History Month commemoration concludes on Thursday, March 29 with “Harriet’s Daughters: An Evening of Conversation and Celebration,” a panel presentation and keynote exploring Harriet Tubman’s legacy and impact on American life. Panelists will include Barbara Arnwine, president and founder of Transformative Justice Coalition and Tatyana Fazlalizadeh, artist and activist. The keynote speech will be given by legal scholar Kimberlé Crenshaw, one of the academic leaders in intersectionality theory.Museum staff will use the hashtag #HiddenHerstory to honor women artists, women activists and women educators who have shaped American history through a commitment to ending discrimination, the release said.All events will take place in the Oprah Winfrey theater. Events “strongly encourage” registration, but are free and open to the public.last_img read more