New Chatter App Connects Celebrities And Fans For Charity

first_imgCelebrities are no strangers to charities, but because of filming, publicity and tour schedules, their time is limited. They typically write a check or appear at fundraisers to help drum up publicity and donations. Recently launched, Chatter is a simple app that can help crowdfund rapid donations to favorite charities and maximize a star’s time and celebrity status.How Chatter WorksChatter connects celebrities with their favorite fans who want to talk over a video chat. But instead of just giving fans a chance to follow their Twitter feed or Instagram account and leave comments, Chatter gives loyal followers a chance to actually talk directly to celebrities.Fans can bid on a video chat with a celebrity for just $5. If that fan wins the raffle, they get to connect with the celebrity for up to 10 minutes.The Celeb ListSo far, stars such as Leonardo DiCaprio and Drake are signed up to chat with their fans. New celebrities and stars are being added, and the list of stars you bid to speak with changes.Stars can sign up to participate directly on the Chatter app, and their identity is verified before bidding for a video chat takes place.The AppThe Chatter app is currently available for download on iOS and Android. You can use any device you want, but it’s crucial to pick a reliable device with a quality camera and reliable signal. You don’t want your once-in-a-lifetime, one-on-one chat with Leonardo DiCaprio to end with a dropped signal and grainy film quality.The CharitiesThe celebrities themselves aren’t pocketing the $5 per bid. Instead, the app helps raise funds for the celeb’s charity of choice. The Chatter app helps crowdfund charity fundraising efforts, all while getting both fans and celebrities involved in the process.Chatter provides a charitable outlet for celebrities to support instead of flying across the country to attend dinner galas and Hollywood events. As an alternative to an expensive fundraising gala, the app can raise unlimited funds in a short period of time.The ChatAsk your favorite celebrities anything you want from what they’re working on to who they’re hanging out with. They might even give you some insights on making it in the business and a personal anecdote about their personal lives.Want to prepare in advance? Before you launch your winning video chat session, take a peek at your favorite celebrity’s social media feeds to see what they’re talking about to bring some fresh questions to the table.last_img read more

Tronc Emerges as Likely Us Weekly Buyer

first_img This would be the first celebrity magazine buy for Tronc — formerly known as Tribune Publishing — which owns many of the country’s largest newspapers, including the Los Angeles Times and the Chicago Tribune. Wenner Media, which also publishes Rolling Stone and Men’s Journal, has struggled to get back on its feet in a difficult print advertising environment following a $3 million lawsuit over a since-retracted campus rape story. This is a developing story. Us Weekly comes with a hefty digital footprint, with 21.9 million digital monthly uniques, according to comScore. This would be a major asset to Tronc as it looks to expand in the digital arena.  Newspaper publisher Tronc is in discussions to buy Us Weekly from Wenner Media, according to sources close to the situation. The deal is rumored to be in the range of $90 million.last_img read more

6 Tips to Reduce Employee Theft

first_img Storeowners don’t want to think their employees will steal from their store. But every day merchants discover that their trusted staff members have done exactly that. According to a retail theft survey conducted by Jack L. Hayes International, a loss prevention consulting firm, one out of every 40 employees was apprehended for theft by their employer in 2012. The survey also found that on average, employees steal 5.5 times more than shoplifters on a per-case average ($715.24 vs $129.12).Thankfully, there are ways to surround yourself with staff you can trust. Here are six tips from our experts:1. Weed out bad apples. Run a background screening and a drug test on all potential hires. Employees with drug addictions are at higher risk for stealing to support their habit. “I believe that past behavior is a good predictor of future behavior,” says King Rogers, chief executive officer of the King Rogers Group, a loss prevention and security management consulting company. “If someone has been convicted of theft in the past, then you don’t want them handling your money.”2. Use the buddy system. Often theft happens when one employee is alone in the store or at the register. Doyle recommends having two employees work for both opening and closing to limit opportunity. Always have refunds and voids witnessed by a second employee or a manager as well, says Mark Doyle, president of Jack L. Hayes International. Rotate the employees paired together and avoid having close friends witness transactions for each other.3. Keep a virtual eye on employees. People will be less likely to steal if they know that you are always watching. A video surveillance system helps deter employees as well as catch theft after it happens. Be sure to include cameras in storage rooms and loading areas as well as in the store. Use high-definition video so you can clearly identify employees and transactions along with allowing integration with facial recognition software.Another way to keep an eye on your employees is to use an exception-based reporting system at your point of sale, says Doyle. He says that the systems will flag possible fraudulent transactions, such as excessive refunds or voids, and excessive refunds or voids outside of store hours. Review video daily and POS several times a week to determine if there are any issues that you need to look into further. Limit the access to your surveillance systems to as few people as possible to avoid tampering. 4. Monitor trash removal. Employees often steal merchandise by concealing it in the outgoing trash and then retrieving it later from the outside trashcan or dumpster. “It’s trash. No one wants to deal with trash, so dishonest employees will often take advantage of this opportunity,” says Doyle. He recommends putting controls in place to reduce the opportunities, such as using clear garbage bags, requiring all boxes to be flattened and locking all dumpsters.5. Have an employee tip line. Set up a confidential way for employees to communicate their co-workers’ suspicious behavior and offer a reward for staff members who provide information to prevent thefts. You could set up an email address for tips as well as a locked-box for tips in the break room. “If people know that their fellow co-workers are watching out for theft, they will think twice before stealing because there are higher odds they will be caught,” says Terrence Shulman, founder of the The Shulman Center for Compulsive Theft, Spending & Hoarding and author of Biting the Hand that Feeds: The Employee Theft Epidemic (Infinity Publishing, 2005).6. Get to know your employees. It’s much easier to steal from someone you don’t know very well, but it is much harder to steal from someone with whom you have a relationship. Shulman recommends connecting with your employees and being aware if they are going through financial difficulties or experiencing high levels of stress, which can increase the impulse to steal. “You might be able to give them extra work, point them in the direction of a local food bank or help them connect with charitable services in the community,” says Shulman. “A happy employee is a more honest employee. It really does help reduce employee theft when your staff feels that you care.” 4 min read Register Now » November 21, 2013 Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box.last_img read more

Strike at Brussels airport leaves hundreds stranded

first_imgStrike at Brussels airport leaves hundreds stranded << Previous PostNext Post >> By: The Associated Press Friday, October 26, 2018 BRUSSELS — Hundreds of passengers have been left stranded at Brussels International Airport after luggage handlers went on strike over workload and pay demands.Overnight, several hundred passengers had to spend the night in the airport after their planes were left stranded. By noon on Friday, well over 100 flights had been cancelled. Some passengers had to line up for hours, hoping to still get a flight at the start of the autumn holiday season.The Aviapartner luggage handling company serves major companies like Ryanair, TUI, EasyJet and British Airways. Tags: Brussels, Strike Sharelast_img read more